Snake Species: Western Tiger Snake

Dressilyme Sample Closeout
We started to practice our online store in Feb, 2009. For the
first sight, we are creating a web base on our many years traditional
background, which is our top competitive Edge by specializing in
wedding, prom dresses

Snake Species: Western Tiger Snake
Notechis scutatus occidentalus

GLAUERT 1948

snake
http://australianmuseum.net.au/Uploads/Images/27834/Western_Tiger_Snake_Jenkins_big.jpg

Higher Taxa Elapidae (Hydrophiinae), Alethinophidia, Serpentes, Squamata (snakes)

Subspecies Notechis scutatus scutatus (PETERS 1861)
Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948

Common Names E: Mainland Tiger Snake
scutatus: Eastern Tiger Snake
occidentalis: Western Tiger Snake
G: Östliche Tigerotter

E: ater: Black Tiger Snake, Krefft’s Tiger Snake
humphreysi: Tasmanian Tiger Snake
niger: Peninsular Tiger Snake
serventyi: Chappell Island Tiger Snake
G: Schwarze Tigerotter

Synonym Naja (Hamadryas) scutata PETERS 1861: 690
Alecto fasciolata JAN 1863: 117 (nom. nud. ?)
Hoplocephalus ater KREFFT 1866: 370
Alecto fasciolata JAN & SORDELLI 1873
Hoplocephalus fuscus STEINDACHNER 1867: 82
Notechis scutatus — BOULENGER 1896
Notechis scutatus niger KINGHORN 1921: 145
Notechis scutatus — KINGHORN 1924
Notechis scutatus ater — GLAUERT 1948
Notechis ater humphreysi WORRELL 1963
Notechis ater serventyi WORRELL 1963
Notechis ater — COGGER 1983: 229
Notechis scutatus — COGGER 1983: 229
Notechis scutatus — WELCH 1994: 93
Notechis ater — WELCH 1994: 93
Notechis ater — COGGER 2000: 659
Notechis scutatus — COGGER 2000: 660
Notechis scutatus — WILSON & SWAN 2010
Notechis scutatus — WALLACH et al. 2014: 488

Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948
Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948
Notechis ater occidentalis — COGGER 2000: 659

Distribution Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria, Western Australia)

ater: Australia (Western Australia, South Australia,Tasmania);Flinders Ranges; Type locality: Flinders Range, S. A. (original register entry cites Port Lincoln, S. A. as the type locality).

niger: Kangaroo Island and other off-shore islands of South Australia.

humphreysi: King and nearby islands, Bass Strait.

occidentalis: SW West Australia.

Type locality: “Java” (in error)

Reproduction Viviparous.

Types Holotype: ZMB 2815, presumed lost (Naja (Hamadryas) scutata PETERS 1862)
Syntypes: probably MSNM, not located, from Australia [Alecto fasciolata JAN 1863].
Syntypes: not found, from Australia [Hoplocephalus fuscus].
Holotype: WAM R9430, from unspecified locality, but collector from Bassendean, W. A. [Notechis scutatus occidentalis].
Holotype: AM 6577 [ater]
Holotype: AM R7124, from Deep Creek, 20 mi from Kingscote, Kangaroo Is., S. A. [Notechis scutatus niger].
Holotype: AM R17955, from New Year Is. near King Is., Bass Strait, Tasmania [Notechis ater humphreysi].
Holotype: AM R17953, from Chappell Is., Furneaux Group, Bass Strait, Tasmania [Notechis ater serventyi].

Synonymy: KEOGH et al. (2005) synonymized N. ater with N. scutatus. Previously, Notechis scutatus niger has been renamed Notechis ater niger. Synonymy partly after Rawlinson 1991.

Diet: Adult mainland snakes feed on frogs and mice, whereas adult island snakes mostly take silver-gull chicks.

Venomous!

Type species: Naja scutata PETERS 1861: 690 is the type species of the genus Notechis BOULENGER 1896.

Etymology Etymology (ater): Named after its color, Latin “ater, atra, atrum” = dark or black.

The western tiger snake head is distinct from its robust body, and grows to 2.0 m in length. Dorsally, it is steel-blue to black in color with bright yellow bands; unbanded specimens occur. The ventral surface is yellow, tending black towards the tail. Midbody scales are in 17 or 19 rows, ventrals number 140 to 165, subcaudals 36 to 51 (single) and the anal scale is single (rarely divided).

As with most snakes, the colours vary widely between individuals and are an unreliable means of identifying subspecies. Accurate identification is best performed with a venom test kit or scale count.

The Western Tiger Snake is variable in colour in colour from brown, olive, grey to black. The most usual pattern is alternating light and dark bands, which gives rise to the common name. Belly cream, yellow, olive green or grey.

Extremely dangerous and can inflict fatal bites. The venom is highly neurotoxic.

References Aubret, F. and R. Shine 2009. Genetic Assimilation and the Postcolonization Erosion of Phenotypic Plasticity in Island Tiger Snakes. Current Biology 19 (22): 1932-1936
Aubret, Fabien; Bonnet, Xavier; Shine, Richard; Maumelat, Stéphanie 2005. Swimming and pregnancy in Tiger snakes, Notechis scutatus. Amphibia-Reptilia 26 (3): 396-400
Aubret, Fabien; Michniewicz, Radika J. 2010. Warming up for cold water: influence of habitat type on thermoregulatory tactics in a semi-aquatic snake. Amphibia-Reptilia 31 (4): 525-531
Aubret, Fabien; Richard Shine & Xavier Bonnet 2004. Adaptive developmental plasticity in snakes. Nature 431: 261
Baehr, M. 1976. Beiträge zur Verbreitung und Ökologie tasmanischer Reptilien. Stuttgarter Beitr. Naturk. (A) 292: 1-24
Clear, Rhian C. 2011. Notechis scutatus (tiger snake) predation. Herpetological Review 42 (3): 442
Cogger, H. G. 2014. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia, 7th ed. CSIRO Publishing, xxx + 1033 pp.
Cogger, H.G. 2000. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia, 6th ed. Ralph Curtis Publishing, Sanibel Island, 808 pp.
Fabien, A., X. Bonnet, S. Maumelat, D. Bradshaw and T. Schwaner 2004. Diet divergence, jaw size and scale counts in two neighbouring populations of tiger snakes (Notechis scutatus). Amphibia-Reptilia 25 (1): 9-17
Fearn, Simon 1993. The tiger snake Notechis scutatus (Serpentes: Elapidae) in Tasmania. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 23 (2): 17-29
Fearn, Simon 1994. Tiger snakes in Tasmania. Monitor: Bulletin of the Victorian Herpetological Society Inc. 5 (3): 121-130
Fearn, Simon 1995. Tiger snakes in Tazmania. Litteratura Serpentium 15 (5): 118-122
Glauert, L. 1948. A western tiger snake, Notechis scutatus occidentalis, subsp. nov. Western Australian Naturalist 1: 139-141
Gomard, Guillaume 2015. Tigerottern: eine Einladung zum Kennenlernen der Reptilien Tasmaniens. Terraria Elaphe 2015 (4): 44-51
Gower, D.; Garrett, K. & Stafford, P. 2012. Snakes. Firefly Books, Buffalo, NY,
144 p..
Hutchinson, M.N. 1979. The reptiles of Kinglake National Park. Victorian Naturalist 96: 124-134
Jan, G. & Sordelli, F. 1873. Iconographie Générale des Ophidiens. Atlas 1860-1881. Milan: Jan & Sordelli, 50 livr.
Jan,G. 1863. Elenco Sistematico degli Ofidi descriti e disegnati per l’Iconografia Generale. Milano, A. Lombardi. vii + 143 pp.
Kinghorn, J. R. 1921. Studies in Australian reptiles. 2. Rec. Austral. Mus. 13: 143-154
Kinghorn, J. Roy 1924. Reptiles and batrachians from south and south-west Australia. Rec. Austral. Mus. 14 (3): 163-183
Krefft, G. 1866. Descriptions of three species of snakes of the genus Hoplocephalus. Proc. Zool. Soc. London 1866: 370-371
Mattison, Chris 2007. The New Encyclopedia of Snakes. Princeton University Press
Michael, D.R.; D.B. Lindenmayer; M. Crane; C. MacGregor; R. Montague-Drake; L. McBurney. 2011. Reptilia, Murray catchment, New South Wales, southeastern Australia. Check List 7 (1):25-29
Mirtschin, P. J., Bailey, N. 1990. A study of the Kreffts Black Tiger Snake Notechis ater ater (Reptilia : Elapidae ). The S. A. Naturalist 64 (3): 52-99.
Murphy, Michael J. 1994. Reptiles and amphibians of Seven Mile Beach National park, NSW. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 24 (2): 24-30
Peters, Wilhem Carl Hartwig 1861. Eine zweite Übersicht (vergl. Monatsberichte 1859 p. 269) der von Hrn. F. Jagor auf Malacca, Java, Borneo und den Philippinen gesammelten und dem Kgl. zoologischen Museum übersandten Schlangen. Monatsber. königl. Akad. Wiss. Berlin. 1861 (Juli): 683-691 [1862 on title page]
Rawlinson P A 1991. Taxonomy and distribution of the Australian tiger snakes (Notechis) and copperheads (Austrelaps) (Serpentes, Elapidae). ROYAL SOCIETY OF VICTORIA PROCEEDINGS 103 (2): 125-135
Rawlinson, P. A. 1974. Biogeography and ecology of the reptiles of Tasmania and the Bass Strait area. In: Williams, W. D. (ed.) Biogeography and Ecology in Tasmania,Chapt. 11. The Hague: Junk, pp. 291-338
Schwaner, T. D. 1984. The identity of red-bellied black snakes on Kangaroo Island. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia 108:137
Schwaner, Terry D. 1990. Geographic variation in scale and skeletal anomalies of tiger snakes (Elapidae: Notechis scutatus-ater complex) in southern Australia. Copeia 1990 (4): 1168-1173
Schwaner,T.D. & Sarre,S.D. 1990. Body size and sexual dimorphism in Mainand and Island Tiger Snakes. Journal of Herpetology 24 (3): 320-322
Seung Hoon, Cha 2012. Snake, the world most beautifull curve [in Korean]. Hownext, 304 pp. [ISBN 978-89-965656-7-3]
Shine, R. 1977. Habitats, diets, and sympatry in snakes: a study from Australia. Can. J. Zool. 55: 1118-1128
Steindachner, F. 1867. In: Reise der Österreichischen Fregatte Novara um die Erde in den Jahren 1857, 1858,1859 unter den Befehlen des Commodore B. von Wüllerstorf-Urbair (Zoologie), Vol. 1, part 3 (Reptilien p.1-98). K. Gerold’s Sohn/Kaiserlich-Königl. Hof- und Staatsdruckerei, Wien [1869 on title page]
Taylor, R. J.;Dudley, A.;Gale, P. G. 1993. Reptiles and amphibians in sclerophyll forest surrounding Old Chum Dam in north-eastern Tasmania. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 23 (1): 26-31
Wilson, S. & Swan, G. 2010. A complete guide to reptiles of Australia, 3rd ed. Chatswood: New Holland, 558 pp.
Worrell, E. 1963. Two new subspecies of the elapine genus Notechis from Bass Strait. Aust. Rept. Park Rec. 2: 2-11
Worrell, Eric 1994. Tiger snake island. Monitor: Bulletin of the Victorian Herpetological Society Inc. 5 (3): 97-112

snake
http://www.gondwanareptileproductions.com/nscutatusoccidentalis.jpg

Image
Little scorpion.com

HeatAndCool.com

**NB. Photos used are for educational purposes. No photos are mine. If you own one of them and would like it removed please message me.

Snake Species: Chappell Island Tiger Snake

Audio Books On Sale Now! Shop at Downpour.com and save big audiobook downloads and CDs every day.
Downpour.com offers a constantly growing selection of tens
of thousands of audiobook titles, real value for your money, and
DRM-free audiobook downloads. Experience our low everyday
prices on every audiobook you download, and get even better
deals on all our downloads when you become a member of the
Downpour Audiobook Club. Welcome to audio books made easy.

Snake Species: Chappell Island Tiger Snake
Notechis ater serventyi

WORRELL 1963

 

snake
http://www.gondwanareptileproductions.com/naserventyi.jpg

Higher Taxa Elapidae (Hydrophiinae), Alethinophidia, Serpentes, Squamata (snakes)

Subspecies Notechis scutatus scutatus (PETERS 1861)
Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948

Common Names E: Mainland Tiger Snake
scutatus: Eastern Tiger Snake
occidentalis: Western Tiger Snake
G: Östliche Tigerotter

E: ater: Black Tiger Snake, Krefft’s Tiger Snake
humphreysi: Tasmanian Tiger Snake
niger: Peninsular Tiger Snake
serventyi: Chappell Island Tiger Snake
G: Schwarze Tigerotter

Synonym Naja (Hamadryas) scutata PETERS 1861: 690
Alecto fasciolata JAN 1863: 117 (nom. nud. ?)
Hoplocephalus ater KREFFT 1866: 370
Alecto fasciolata JAN & SORDELLI 1873
Hoplocephalus fuscus STEINDACHNER 1867: 82
Notechis scutatus — BOULENGER 1896
Notechis scutatus niger KINGHORN 1921: 145
Notechis scutatus — KINGHORN 1924
Notechis scutatus ater — GLAUERT 1948
Notechis ater humphreysi WORRELL 1963
Notechis ater serventyi WORRELL 1963
Notechis ater — COGGER 1983: 229
Notechis scutatus — COGGER 1983: 229
Notechis scutatus — WELCH 1994: 93
Notechis ater — WELCH 1994: 93
Notechis ater — COGGER 2000: 659
Notechis scutatus — COGGER 2000: 660
Notechis scutatus — WILSON & SWAN 2010
Notechis scutatus — WALLACH et al. 2014: 488

Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948
Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948
Notechis ater occidentalis — COGGER 2000: 659

Distribution Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria, Western Australia)

ater: Australia (Western Australia, South Australia,Tasmania);Flinders Ranges; Type locality: Flinders Range, S. A. (original register entry cites Port Lincoln, S. A. as the type locality).

niger: Kangaroo Island and other off-shore islands of South Australia.

humphreysi: King and nearby islands, Bass Strait.

occidentalis: SW West Australia.

Type locality: “Java” (in error)

Reproduction Viviparous.

snake
http://www.ozanimals.com/image/albums/australia/Reptile/Z-charliebrewer-chappelisland.jpg

Types Holotype: ZMB 2815, presumed lost (Naja (Hamadryas) scutata PETERS 1862)
Syntypes: probably MSNM, not located, from Australia [Alecto fasciolata JAN 1863].
Syntypes: not found, from Australia [Hoplocephalus fuscus].
Holotype: WAM R9430, from unspecified locality, but collector from Bassendean, W. A. [Notechis scutatus occidentalis].
Holotype: AM 6577 [ater]
Holotype: AM R7124, from Deep Creek, 20 mi from Kingscote, Kangaroo Is., S. A. [Notechis scutatus niger].
Holotype: AM R17955, from New Year Is. near King Is., Bass Strait, Tasmania [Notechis ater humphreysi].
Holotype: AM R17953, from Chappell Is., Furneaux Group, Bass Strait, Tasmania [Notechis ater serventyi].

Synonymy: KEOGH et al. (2005) synonymized N. ater with N. scutatus. Previously, Notechis scutatus niger has been renamed Notechis ater niger. Synonymy partly after Rawlinson 1991.

Diet: Adult mainland snakes feed on frogs and mice, whereas adult island snakes mostly take silver-gull chicks.

Venomous!

Type species: Naja scutata PETERS 1861: 690 is the type species of the genus Notechis BOULENGER 1896.

Etymology Etymology (ater): Named after its color, Latin “ater, atra, atrum” = dark or black.

The Chappell Island tiger snake has a blunt head distinct from a robust body. The giant of the tiger snakes species, it averages 1.9 m (over 6 ft) in length. Dorsally, its colour is olive-brown to almost black, sometimes with lighter crossbands. The ventral surface is usually lighter in colour. Juveniles are banded. Mid-body scales are in 17 rows; ventrals number 160 to 171, subcaudals 47 to 52 (single), and the anal scale is single. These snakes are quite docile.

As with most snakes, the colours vary widely between individuals and are an unreliable means of identifying subspecies. Accurate identification is best performed with a venom test kit or scale count.

The Chappell Island Tiger Snake is the largest tiger snake and has a blunt head and robust body. The body is olive-brown to almost black, sometimes with lighter cross bands. The underside is lighter in colour. Juveniles are banded. Some authors consider this snake to be a form of Notechis scutatus.

The Chappell Island tiger snake is the largest member of the tiger snake family. As one of Australia’s deadliest, it has a big strong body, dark stout head, and can reach up to 1.9m long. Its magnificent olive-green to black body colouring, with lighter bands and underbelly, sets the Chappell Island tiger snake apart from other tiger snakes.

The Chappell Island tiger snake is named after the place where it is most commonly found, Mount Chappell Island. Situated off the north-eastern Tasmanian coastline, Mount Chappell Island is one of several islands that form the Furneaux Group. The Chappell Island tiger snake is found on most of the islands in the group.

In the wild, the Chappell Island tiger snake preys on small birds, predominantly shearwater chicks. They will also eat frogs and other small mammals.

Like all tiger snakes, the Chappell Island tiger snake does not lay eggs. Females give birth to 20 – 30 live young.

snake
http://i913.photobucket.com/albums/ac333/BlakesLife/BushcraftOz/IMGP9509.jpg

References Aubret, F. and R. Shine 2009. Genetic Assimilation and the Postcolonization Erosion of Phenotypic Plasticity in Island Tiger Snakes. Current Biology 19 (22): 1932-1936
Aubret, Fabien; Bonnet, Xavier; Shine, Richard; Maumelat, Stéphanie 2005. Swimming and pregnancy in Tiger snakes, Notechis scutatus. Amphibia-Reptilia 26 (3): 396-400
Aubret, Fabien; Michniewicz, Radika J. 2010. Warming up for cold water: influence of habitat type on thermoregulatory tactics in a semi-aquatic snake. Amphibia-Reptilia 31 (4): 525-531
Aubret, Fabien; Richard Shine & Xavier Bonnet 2004. Adaptive developmental plasticity in snakes. Nature 431: 261
Baehr, M. 1976. Beiträge zur Verbreitung und Ökologie tasmanischer Reptilien. Stuttgarter Beitr. Naturk. (A) 292: 1-24
Clear, Rhian C. 2011. Notechis scutatus (tiger snake) predation. Herpetological Review 42 (3): 442
Cogger, H. G. 2014. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia, 7th ed. CSIRO Publishing, xxx + 1033 pp.
Cogger, H.G. 2000. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia, 6th ed. Ralph Curtis Publishing, Sanibel Island, 808 pp.
Fabien, A., X. Bonnet, S. Maumelat, D. Bradshaw and T. Schwaner 2004. Diet divergence, jaw size and scale counts in two neighbouring populations of tiger snakes (Notechis scutatus). Amphibia-Reptilia 25 (1): 9-17
Fearn, Simon 1993. The tiger snake Notechis scutatus (Serpentes: Elapidae) in Tasmania. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 23 (2): 17-29
Fearn, Simon 1994. Tiger snakes in Tasmania. Monitor: Bulletin of the Victorian Herpetological Society Inc. 5 (3): 121-130
Fearn, Simon 1995. Tiger snakes in Tazmania. Litteratura Serpentium 15 (5): 118-122
Glauert, L. 1948. A western tiger snake, Notechis scutatus occidentalis, subsp. nov. Western Australian Naturalist 1: 139-141
Gomard, Guillaume 2015. Tigerottern: eine Einladung zum Kennenlernen der Reptilien Tasmaniens. Terraria Elaphe 2015 (4): 44-51
Gower, D.; Garrett, K. & Stafford, P. 2012. Snakes. Firefly Books, Buffalo, NY,
144 p..
Hutchinson, M.N. 1979. The reptiles of Kinglake National Park. Victorian Naturalist 96: 124-134
Jan, G. & Sordelli, F. 1873. Iconographie Générale des Ophidiens. Atlas 1860-1881. Milan: Jan & Sordelli, 50 livr.
Jan,G. 1863. Elenco Sistematico degli Ofidi descriti e disegnati per l’Iconografia Generale. Milano, A. Lombardi. vii + 143 pp.
Kinghorn, J. R. 1921. Studies in Australian reptiles. 2. Rec. Austral. Mus. 13: 143-154
Kinghorn, J. Roy 1924. Reptiles and batrachians from south and south-west Australia. Rec. Austral. Mus. 14 (3): 163-183
Krefft, G. 1866. Descriptions of three species of snakes of the genus Hoplocephalus. Proc. Zool. Soc. London 1866: 370-371
Mattison, Chris 2007. The New Encyclopedia of Snakes. Princeton University Press
Michael, D.R.; D.B. Lindenmayer; M. Crane; C. MacGregor; R. Montague-Drake; L. McBurney. 2011. Reptilia, Murray catchment, New South Wales, southeastern Australia. Check List 7 (1):25-29
Mirtschin, P. J., Bailey, N. 1990. A study of the Kreffts Black Tiger Snake Notechis ater ater (Reptilia : Elapidae ). The S. A. Naturalist 64 (3): 52-99.
Murphy, Michael J. 1994. Reptiles and amphibians of Seven Mile Beach National park, NSW. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 24 (2): 24-30
Peters, Wilhem Carl Hartwig 1861. Eine zweite Übersicht (vergl. Monatsberichte 1859 p. 269) der von Hrn. F. Jagor auf Malacca, Java, Borneo und den Philippinen gesammelten und dem Kgl. zoologischen Museum übersandten Schlangen. Monatsber. königl. Akad. Wiss. Berlin. 1861 (Juli): 683-691 [1862 on title page]
Rawlinson P A 1991. Taxonomy and distribution of the Australian tiger snakes (Notechis) and copperheads (Austrelaps) (Serpentes, Elapidae). ROYAL SOCIETY OF VICTORIA PROCEEDINGS 103 (2): 125-135
Rawlinson, P. A. 1974. Biogeography and ecology of the reptiles of Tasmania and the Bass Strait area. In: Williams, W. D. (ed.) Biogeography and Ecology in Tasmania,Chapt. 11. The Hague: Junk, pp. 291-338
Schwaner, T. D. 1984. The identity of red-bellied black snakes on Kangaroo Island. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia 108:137
Schwaner, Terry D. 1990. Geographic variation in scale and skeletal anomalies of tiger snakes (Elapidae: Notechis scutatus-ater complex) in southern Australia. Copeia 1990 (4): 1168-1173
Schwaner,T.D. & Sarre,S.D. 1990. Body size and sexual dimorphism in Mainand and Island Tiger Snakes. Journal of Herpetology 24 (3): 320-322
Seung Hoon, Cha 2012. Snake, the world most beautifull curve [in Korean]. Hownext, 304 pp. [ISBN 978-89-965656-7-3]
Shine, R. 1977. Habitats, diets, and sympatry in snakes: a study from Australia. Can. J. Zool. 55: 1118-1128
Steindachner, F. 1867. In: Reise der Österreichischen Fregatte Novara um die Erde in den Jahren 1857, 1858,1859 unter den Befehlen des Commodore B. von Wüllerstorf-Urbair (Zoologie), Vol. 1, part 3 (Reptilien p.1-98). K. Gerold’s Sohn/Kaiserlich-Königl. Hof- und Staatsdruckerei, Wien [1869 on title page]
Taylor, R. J.;Dudley, A.;Gale, P. G. 1993. Reptiles and amphibians in sclerophyll forest surrounding Old Chum Dam in north-eastern Tasmania. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 23 (1): 26-31
Wilson, S. & Swan, G. 2010. A complete guide to reptiles of Australia, 3rd ed. Chatswood: New Holland, 558 pp.
Worrell, E. 1963. Two new subspecies of the elapine genus Notechis from Bass Strait. Aust. Rept. Park Rec. 2: 2-11
Worrell, Eric 1994. Tiger snake island. Monitor: Bulletin of the Victorian Herpetological Society Inc. 5 (3): 97-112

snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/May26th20111.jpg

Image
Little scorpion.com

snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/May26th201143.jpg

HeatAndCool.com

snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/May20th201210.jpg
snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/June6th201215.jpg

**NB. Photos used are for educational purposes. No photos are mine. If you own one of them and would like it removed please message me.

Snake Species: Peninsular Tiger Snake

Dotti NZ

Dotti NZ knows that fashion is supposed to be fun. We
also know that you have a craving for keeping up with
the latest trends, so we aim to deliver the best fashion
finds into your wardrobe ultra-fast.

Snake Species: Peninsular Tiger Snake
Notechis ater niger

KINGHORN 1921

snake
http://www.gondwanareptileproductions.com/naniger.jpg

Higher Taxa Elapidae (Hydrophiinae), Alethinophidia, Serpentes, Squamata (snakes)

Subspecies Notechis scutatus scutatus (PETERS 1861)
Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948

Common Names E: Mainland Tiger Snake
scutatus: Eastern Tiger Snake
occidentalis: Western Tiger Snake
G: Östliche Tigerotter

E: ater: Black Tiger Snake, Krefft’s Tiger Snake
humphreysi: Tasmanian Tiger Snake
niger: Peninsular Tiger Snake
serventyi: Chappell Island Tiger Snake
G: Schwarze Tigerotter

Synonym Naja (Hamadryas) scutata PETERS 1861: 690
Alecto fasciolata JAN 1863: 117 (nom. nud. ?)
Hoplocephalus ater KREFFT 1866: 370
Alecto fasciolata JAN & SORDELLI 1873
Hoplocephalus fuscus STEINDACHNER 1867: 82
Notechis scutatus — BOULENGER 1896
Notechis scutatus niger KINGHORN 1921: 145
Notechis scutatus — KINGHORN 1924
Notechis scutatus ater — GLAUERT 1948
Notechis ater humphreysi WORRELL 1963
Notechis ater serventyi WORRELL 1963
Notechis ater — COGGER 1983: 229
Notechis scutatus — COGGER 1983: 229
Notechis scutatus — WELCH 1994: 93
Notechis ater — WELCH 1994: 93
Notechis ater — COGGER 2000: 659
Notechis scutatus — COGGER 2000: 660
Notechis scutatus — WILSON & SWAN 2010
Notechis scutatus — WALLACH et al. 2014: 488

Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948
Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948
Notechis ater occidentalis — COGGER 2000: 659

snake
http://reptilesofaustralia.com/snakes/elapids/naniger.jpg

Distribution Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria, Western Australia)

ater: Australia (Western Australia, South Australia,Tasmania);Flinders Ranges; Type locality: Flinders Range, S. A. (original register entry cites Port Lincoln, S. A. as the type locality).

niger: Kangaroo Island and other off-shore islands of South Australia.

humphreysi: King and nearby islands, Bass Strait.

occidentalis: SW West Australia.

Type locality: “Java” (in error)

Reproduction Viviparous.

Types Holotype: ZMB 2815, presumed lost (Naja (Hamadryas) scutata PETERS 1862)
Syntypes: probably MSNM, not located, from Australia [Alecto fasciolata JAN 1863].
Syntypes: not found, from Australia [Hoplocephalus fuscus].
Holotype: WAM R9430, from unspecified locality, but collector from Bassendean, W. A. [Notechis scutatus occidentalis].
Holotype: AM 6577 [ater]
Holotype: AM R7124, from Deep Creek, 20 mi from Kingscote, Kangaroo Is., S. A. [Notechis scutatus niger].
Holotype: AM R17955, from New Year Is. near King Is., Bass Strait, Tasmania [Notechis ater humphreysi].
Holotype: AM R17953, from Chappell Is., Furneaux Group, Bass Strait, Tasmania [Notechis ater serventyi].

Synonymy: KEOGH et al. (2005) synonymized N. ater with N. scutatus. Previously, Notechis scutatus niger has been renamed Notechis ater niger. Synonymy partly after Rawlinson 1991.

Diet: Adult mainland snakes feed on frogs and mice, whereas adult island snakes mostly take silver-gull chicks.

Venomous!

Type species: Naja scutata PETERS 1861: 690 is the type species of the genus Notechis BOULENGER 1896.

Etymology Etymology (ater): Named after its color, Latin “ater, atra, atrum” = dark or black.

snake
http://reptilesofaustralia.com/snakes/elapids/naterniger2.jpg

The Peninsula tiger snake has a blunt head distinct from a robust body; it averages 1.1 m (3.5 ft) in length. Roxby Island specimens are much smaller, averaging 0.86 m in length. Dorsally, it is generally jet black, sometimes with white or cream markings around the lips and chin. On Kangaroo Island, specimens are highly variable in colour, often exhibiting banding and uniform brown colours. The ventral surface is dark grey to black, with some specimens on Kangaroo Island even possessing red bellies. The ventral surface becomes much lighter prior to shedding. Juveniles nearly always have banding. Midbody scales are in 17, 18, 19 and rarely 21 rows, ventrals number 160 to 184, subcaudals 45 to 54 (single) and the anal scale is single.

As with most snakes, the colours vary widely between individuals and are an unreliable means of identifying subspecies. Accurate identification is best performed with a venom test kit or scale count.

snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/October2nd2011106.jpg

References Aubret, F. and R. Shine 2009. Genetic Assimilation and the Postcolonization Erosion of Phenotypic Plasticity in Island Tiger Snakes. Current Biology 19 (22): 1932-1936
Aubret, Fabien; Bonnet, Xavier; Shine, Richard; Maumelat, Stéphanie 2005. Swimming and pregnancy in Tiger snakes, Notechis scutatus. Amphibia-Reptilia 26 (3): 396-400
Aubret, Fabien; Michniewicz, Radika J. 2010. Warming up for cold water: influence of habitat type on thermoregulatory tactics in a semi-aquatic snake. Amphibia-Reptilia 31 (4): 525-531
Aubret, Fabien; Richard Shine & Xavier Bonnet 2004. Adaptive developmental plasticity in snakes. Nature 431: 261
Baehr, M. 1976. Beiträge zur Verbreitung und Ökologie tasmanischer Reptilien. Stuttgarter Beitr. Naturk. (A) 292: 1-24
Clear, Rhian C. 2011. Notechis scutatus (tiger snake) predation. Herpetological Review 42 (3): 442
Cogger, H. G. 2014. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia, 7th ed. CSIRO Publishing, xxx + 1033 pp.
Cogger, H.G. 2000. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia, 6th ed. Ralph Curtis Publishing, Sanibel Island, 808 pp.
Fabien, A., X. Bonnet, S. Maumelat, D. Bradshaw and T. Schwaner 2004. Diet divergence, jaw size and scale counts in two neighbouring populations of tiger snakes (Notechis scutatus). Amphibia-Reptilia 25 (1): 9-17
Fearn, Simon 1993. The tiger snake Notechis scutatus (Serpentes: Elapidae) in Tasmania. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 23 (2): 17-29
Fearn, Simon 1994. Tiger snakes in Tasmania. Monitor: Bulletin of the Victorian Herpetological Society Inc. 5 (3): 121-130
Fearn, Simon 1995. Tiger snakes in Tazmania. Litteratura Serpentium 15 (5): 118-122
Glauert, L. 1948. A western tiger snake, Notechis scutatus occidentalis, subsp. nov. Western Australian Naturalist 1: 139-141
Gomard, Guillaume 2015. Tigerottern: eine Einladung zum Kennenlernen der Reptilien Tasmaniens. Terraria Elaphe 2015 (4): 44-51
Gower, D.; Garrett, K. & Stafford, P. 2012. Snakes. Firefly Books, Buffalo, NY,
144 p..
Hutchinson, M.N. 1979. The reptiles of Kinglake National Park. Victorian Naturalist 96: 124-134
Jan, G. & Sordelli, F. 1873. Iconographie Générale des Ophidiens. Atlas 1860-1881. Milan: Jan & Sordelli, 50 livr.
Jan,G. 1863. Elenco Sistematico degli Ofidi descriti e disegnati per l’Iconografia Generale. Milano, A. Lombardi. vii + 143 pp.

snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/October2nd2011146.jpg

Kinghorn, J. R. 1921. Studies in Australian reptiles. 2. Rec. Austral. Mus. 13: 143-154
Kinghorn, J. Roy 1924. Reptiles and batrachians from south and south-west Australia. Rec. Austral. Mus. 14 (3): 163-183
Krefft, G. 1866. Descriptions of three species of snakes of the genus Hoplocephalus. Proc. Zool. Soc. London 1866: 370-371
Mattison, Chris 2007. The New Encyclopedia of Snakes. Princeton University Press
Michael, D.R.; D.B. Lindenmayer; M. Crane; C. MacGregor; R. Montague-Drake; L. McBurney. 2011. Reptilia, Murray catchment, New South Wales, southeastern Australia. Check List 7 (1):25-29
Mirtschin, P. J., Bailey, N. 1990. A study of the Kreffts Black Tiger Snake Notechis ater ater (Reptilia : Elapidae ). The S. A. Naturalist 64 (3): 52-99.
Murphy, Michael J. 1994. Reptiles and amphibians of Seven Mile Beach National park, NSW. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 24 (2): 24-30
Peters, Wilhem Carl Hartwig 1861. Eine zweite Übersicht (vergl. Monatsberichte 1859 p. 269) der von Hrn. F. Jagor auf Malacca, Java, Borneo und den Philippinen gesammelten und dem Kgl. zoologischen Museum übersandten Schlangen. Monatsber. königl. Akad. Wiss. Berlin. 1861 (Juli): 683-691 [1862 on title page]
Rawlinson P A 1991. Taxonomy and distribution of the Australian tiger snakes (Notechis) and copperheads (Austrelaps) (Serpentes, Elapidae). ROYAL SOCIETY OF VICTORIA PROCEEDINGS 103 (2): 125-135
Rawlinson, P. A. 1974. Biogeography and ecology of the reptiles of Tasmania and the Bass Strait area. In: Williams, W. D. (ed.) Biogeography and Ecology in Tasmania,Chapt. 11. The Hague: Junk, pp. 291-338
Schwaner, T. D. 1984. The identity of red-bellied black snakes on Kangaroo Island. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia 108:137
Schwaner, Terry D. 1990. Geographic variation in scale and skeletal anomalies of tiger snakes (Elapidae: Notechis scutatus-ater complex) in southern Australia. Copeia 1990 (4): 1168-1173
Schwaner,T.D. & Sarre,S.D. 1990. Body size and sexual dimorphism in Mainand and Island Tiger Snakes. Journal of Herpetology 24 (3): 320-322
Seung Hoon, Cha 2012. Snake, the world most beautifull curve [in Korean]. Hownext, 304 pp. [ISBN 978-89-965656-7-3]
Shine, R. 1977. Habitats, diets, and sympatry in snakes: a study from Australia. Can. J. Zool. 55: 1118-1128
Steindachner, F. 1867. In: Reise der Österreichischen Fregatte Novara um die Erde in den Jahren 1857, 1858,1859 unter den Befehlen des Commodore B. von Wüllerstorf-Urbair (Zoologie), Vol. 1, part 3 (Reptilien p.1-98). K. Gerold’s Sohn/Kaiserlich-Königl. Hof- und Staatsdruckerei, Wien [1869 on title page]
Taylor, R. J.;Dudley, A.;Gale, P. G. 1993. Reptiles and amphibians in sclerophyll forest surrounding Old Chum Dam in north-eastern Tasmania. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 23 (1): 26-31
Wilson, S. & Swan, G. 2010. A complete guide to reptiles of Australia, 3rd ed. Chatswood: New Holland, 558 pp.
Worrell, E. 1963. Two new subspecies of the elapine genus Notechis from Bass Strait. Aust. Rept. Park Rec. 2: 2-11
Worrell, Eric 1994. Tiger snake island. Monitor: Bulletin of the Victorian Herpetological Society Inc. 5 (3): 97-112

snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/April7th20124.jpg
snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/April7th201219.jpg

Image
Little scorpion.com

snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/May1st20121.jpg
snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/P5060137.jpg

HeatAndCool.com

snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/P5060169.jpg

snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/April29th20127.jpg
snake
http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g332/getarealdog1/P4290316.jpg

**NB. Photos used are for educational purposes. No photos are mine. If you own one of them and would like it removed please message me.

Snake Species: Tasmanian Tiger Snake

Dotti -Just Group
Dotti knows that fashion is supposed to be fun. We also
know that you have a craving for keeping up with the
latest trends, so we aim to deliver the best fashion finds
into your wardrobe ultra-fast. We regularly scour the high
street and the globe to provide you with fresh outfit
inspiration to make sure you feel as if the world is your
own personal catwalk.

Snake Species: Tasmanian Tiger Snake
Notechis ater humphreysi

WORRELL 1963

 

snake
http://www.gondwanareptileproductions.com/nahumphreysi.jpg

Higher Taxa Elapidae (Hydrophiinae), Alethinophidia, Serpentes, Squamata (snakes)

Subspecies Notechis scutatus scutatus (PETERS 1861)
Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948

Common Names E: Mainland Tiger Snake
scutatus: Eastern Tiger Snake
occidentalis: Western Tiger Snake
G: Östliche Tigerotter

E: ater: Black Tiger Snake, Krefft’s Tiger Snake
humphreysi: Tasmanian Tiger Snake
niger: Peninsular Tiger Snake
serventyi: Chappell Island Tiger Snake
G: Schwarze Tigerotter

Synonym Naja (Hamadryas) scutata PETERS 1861: 690
Alecto fasciolata JAN 1863: 117 (nom. nud. ?)
Hoplocephalus ater KREFFT 1866: 370
Alecto fasciolata JAN & SORDELLI 1873
Hoplocephalus fuscus STEINDACHNER 1867: 82
Notechis scutatus — BOULENGER 1896
Notechis scutatus niger KINGHORN 1921: 145
Notechis scutatus — KINGHORN 1924
Notechis scutatus ater — GLAUERT 1948
Notechis ater humphreysi WORRELL 1963
Notechis ater serventyi WORRELL 1963
Notechis ater — COGGER 1983: 229
Notechis scutatus — COGGER 1983: 229
Notechis scutatus — WELCH 1994: 93
Notechis ater — WELCH 1994: 93
Notechis ater — COGGER 2000: 659
Notechis scutatus — COGGER 2000: 660
Notechis scutatus — WILSON & SWAN 2010
Notechis scutatus — WALLACH et al. 2014: 488

Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948
Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948
Notechis ater occidentalis — COGGER 2000: 659

Distribution Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria, Western Australia)

ater: Australia (Western Australia, South Australia,Tasmania);Flinders Ranges; Type locality: Flinders Range, S. A. (original register entry cites Port Lincoln, S. A. as the type locality).

niger: Kangaroo Island and other off-shore islands of South Australia.

humphreysi: King and nearby islands, Bass Strait.

occidentalis: SW West Australia.

Type locality: “Java” (in error)

Reproduction Viviparous.

Types Holotype: ZMB 2815, presumed lost (Naja (Hamadryas) scutata PETERS 1862)
Syntypes: probably MSNM, not located, from Australia [Alecto fasciolata JAN 1863].
Syntypes: not found, from Australia [Hoplocephalus fuscus].
Holotype: WAM R9430, from unspecified locality, but collector from Bassendean, W. A. [Notechis scutatus occidentalis].
Holotype: AM 6577 [ater]
Holotype: AM R7124, from Deep Creek, 20 mi from Kingscote, Kangaroo Is., S. A. [Notechis scutatus niger].
Holotype: AM R17955, from New Year Is. near King Is., Bass Strait, Tasmania [Notechis ater humphreysi].
Holotype: AM R17953, from Chappell Is., Furneaux Group, Bass Strait, Tasmania [Notechis ater serventyi].

Synonymy: KEOGH et al. (2005) synonymized N. ater with N. scutatus. Previously, Notechis scutatus niger has been renamed Notechis ater niger. Synonymy partly after Rawlinson 1991.

Diet: Adult mainland snakes feed on frogs and mice, whereas adult island snakes mostly take silver-gull chicks.

Venomous!

Type species: Naja scutata PETERS 1861: 690 is the type species of the genus Notechis BOULENGER 1896.

Etymology Etymology (ater): Named after its color, Latin “ater, atra, atrum” = dark or black.

The King Island and Tasmanian tiger snakes each have a blunt head distinct from a robust body. Younger snakes may be slimmer and similar to other tiger snakes, eventually growing up to 1.5 m in length. Dorsally, they may be jet black, jet black with lighter crossbands, grey with black flecks forming faint bands, or an unbanded grey or brown. The ventral surface is usually a lighter colour. Midbody scales are in 19, 17 or sometimes 15 rows, ventrals number 161 to 174, subcaudals 48 to 52 (single) and the anal scale is single. Tasmanian tiger snakes tend to be quiet snakes, probably due to the lower temperature ranges they inhabit.

As with most snakes, the colours vary widely between individuals and are an unreliable means of identifying subspecies. Accurate identification is best performed with a venom test kit or scale count.

Tasmanian Black tiger snakes are usually active during the day, although during hot weather they will become nocturnal. Their dark colouration assists with survival in the extreme cold that they must tolerate throughout most of the year in Tasmania. Being black allows the black tiger snake to absorb heat more readily. It also means that they are absolutely spectacular to see and even tougher to spot in the scrub. Their sensitive forked tongue helps this snake to detect which underground burrows contain a food source.

The black tiger snake is only found on the island of Tasmania. This species of snake inhabits dense woodland, heathy shrub land and dense tussock grassland, often around waterways and swamps.

A black tiger snake’s diet consists of frogs, small mammals, lizards and other snakes. On small offshore islands where the shearwater (seabird) colonies exist, adult black tiger snakes will seasonally gorge feed on chicks to build fat reserves for the rest of the year. Adults killing large prey do not even need to complete a bite in order to inject venom, this being injected by momentary muscular pressure on the venom gland as the fangs penetrate in an open-mouthed jab-bite. The ungripped prey is allowed to pull away and attempt an escape. After a short delay, the black tiger snake will follow the scent of the prey towards its cover or retreat, which it rarely reaches before succumbing to the venom. Juveniles killing small skinks and frogs usually bite and maintain their jaw grip until the prey can be ingested.

snake
https://www.australiazoo.com.au/our-animals/amazing-animals/images/black-tiger-snake.jpg

References Aubret, F. and R. Shine 2009. Genetic Assimilation and the Postcolonization Erosion of Phenotypic Plasticity in Island Tiger Snakes. Current Biology 19 (22): 1932-1936
Aubret, Fabien; Bonnet, Xavier; Shine, Richard; Maumelat, Stéphanie 2005. Swimming and pregnancy in Tiger snakes, Notechis scutatus. Amphibia-Reptilia 26 (3): 396-400
Aubret, Fabien; Michniewicz, Radika J. 2010. Warming up for cold water: influence of habitat type on thermoregulatory tactics in a semi-aquatic snake. Amphibia-Reptilia 31 (4): 525-531
Aubret, Fabien; Richard Shine & Xavier Bonnet 2004. Adaptive developmental plasticity in snakes. Nature 431: 261
Baehr, M. 1976. Beiträge zur Verbreitung und Ökologie tasmanischer Reptilien. Stuttgarter Beitr. Naturk. (A) 292: 1-24
Clear, Rhian C. 2011. Notechis scutatus (tiger snake) predation. Herpetological Review 42 (3): 442
Cogger, H. G. 2014. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia, 7th ed. CSIRO Publishing, xxx + 1033 pp.
Cogger, H.G. 2000. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia, 6th ed. Ralph Curtis Publishing, Sanibel Island, 808 pp.
Fabien, A., X. Bonnet, S. Maumelat, D. Bradshaw and T. Schwaner 2004. Diet divergence, jaw size and scale counts in two neighbouring populations of tiger snakes (Notechis scutatus). Amphibia-Reptilia 25 (1): 9-17
Fearn, Simon 1993. The tiger snake Notechis scutatus (Serpentes: Elapidae) in Tasmania. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 23 (2): 17-29
Fearn, Simon 1994. Tiger snakes in Tasmania. Monitor: Bulletin of the Victorian Herpetological Society Inc. 5 (3): 121-130
Fearn, Simon 1995. Tiger snakes in Tazmania. Litteratura Serpentium 15 (5): 118-122
Glauert, L. 1948. A western tiger snake, Notechis scutatus occidentalis, subsp. nov. Western Australian Naturalist 1: 139-141
Gomard, Guillaume 2015. Tigerottern: eine Einladung zum Kennenlernen der Reptilien Tasmaniens. Terraria Elaphe 2015 (4): 44-51
Gower, D.; Garrett, K. & Stafford, P. 2012. Snakes. Firefly Books, Buffalo, NY,
144 p..
Hutchinson, M.N. 1979. The reptiles of Kinglake National Park. Victorian Naturalist 96: 124-134
Jan, G. & Sordelli, F. 1873. Iconographie Générale des Ophidiens. Atlas 1860-1881. Milan: Jan & Sordelli, 50 livr.
Jan,G. 1863. Elenco Sistematico degli Ofidi descriti e disegnati per l’Iconografia Generale. Milano, A. Lombardi. vii + 143 pp.
Kinghorn, J. R. 1921. Studies in Australian reptiles. 2. Rec. Austral. Mus. 13: 143-154
Kinghorn, J. Roy 1924. Reptiles and batrachians from south and south-west Australia. Rec. Austral. Mus. 14 (3): 163-183
Krefft, G. 1866. Descriptions of three species of snakes of the genus Hoplocephalus. Proc. Zool. Soc. London 1866: 370-371
Mattison, Chris 2007. The New Encyclopedia of Snakes. Princeton University Press
Michael, D.R.; D.B. Lindenmayer; M. Crane; C. MacGregor; R. Montague-Drake; L. McBurney. 2011. Reptilia, Murray catchment, New South Wales, southeastern Australia. Check List 7 (1):25-29
Mirtschin, P. J., Bailey, N. 1990. A study of the Kreffts Black Tiger Snake Notechis ater ater (Reptilia : Elapidae ). The S. A. Naturalist 64 (3): 52-99.
Murphy, Michael J. 1994. Reptiles and amphibians of Seven Mile Beach National park, NSW. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 24 (2): 24-30
Peters, Wilhem Carl Hartwig 1861. Eine zweite Übersicht (vergl. Monatsberichte 1859 p. 269) der von Hrn. F. Jagor auf Malacca, Java, Borneo und den Philippinen gesammelten und dem Kgl. zoologischen Museum übersandten Schlangen. Monatsber. königl. Akad. Wiss. Berlin. 1861 (Juli): 683-691 [1862 on title page]
Rawlinson P A 1991. Taxonomy and distribution of the Australian tiger snakes (Notechis) and copperheads (Austrelaps) (Serpentes, Elapidae). ROYAL SOCIETY OF VICTORIA PROCEEDINGS 103 (2): 125-135
Rawlinson, P. A. 1974. Biogeography and ecology of the reptiles of Tasmania and the Bass Strait area. In: Williams, W. D. (ed.) Biogeography and Ecology in Tasmania,Chapt. 11. The Hague: Junk, pp. 291-338
Schwaner, T. D. 1984. The identity of red-bellied black snakes on Kangaroo Island. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia 108:137
Schwaner, Terry D. 1990. Geographic variation in scale and skeletal anomalies of tiger snakes (Elapidae: Notechis scutatus-ater complex) in southern Australia. Copeia 1990 (4): 1168-1173
Schwaner,T.D. & Sarre,S.D. 1990. Body size and sexual dimorphism in Mainand and Island Tiger Snakes. Journal of Herpetology 24 (3): 320-322
Seung Hoon, Cha 2012. Snake, the world most beautifull curve [in Korean]. Hownext, 304 pp. [ISBN 978-89-965656-7-3]
Shine, R. 1977. Habitats, diets, and sympatry in snakes: a study from Australia. Can. J. Zool. 55: 1118-1128
Steindachner, F. 1867. In: Reise der Österreichischen Fregatte Novara um die Erde in den Jahren 1857, 1858,1859 unter den Befehlen des Commodore B. von Wüllerstorf-Urbair (Zoologie), Vol. 1, part 3 (Reptilien p.1-98). K. Gerold’s Sohn/Kaiserlich-Königl. Hof- und Staatsdruckerei, Wien [1869 on title page]
Taylor, R. J.;Dudley, A.;Gale, P. G. 1993. Reptiles and amphibians in sclerophyll forest surrounding Old Chum Dam in north-eastern Tasmania. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 23 (1): 26-31
Wilson, S. & Swan, G. 2010. A complete guide to reptiles of Australia, 3rd ed. Chatswood: New Holland, 558 pp.
Worrell, E. 1963. Two new subspecies of the elapine genus Notechis from Bass Strait. Aust. Rept. Park Rec. 2: 2-11
Worrell, Eric 1994. Tiger snake island. Monitor: Bulletin of the Victorian Herpetological Society Inc. 5 (3): 97-112

snake
http://www.ozanimals.com/image/albums/australia/Reptile/normal_200404070049-blacktigernake.jpg

Image
Little scorpion.com

HeatAndCool.com

**NB. Photos used are for educational purposes. No photos are mine. If you own one of them and would like it removed please message me.

Snake Species: Black Tiger Snake

FREE SHIPPING

Our Doodle Pants have been seen on countless Celebrties
kids such as Jessica Simpson’s adorable daughter Maxwell,
Oliva Wilde’s son Otis, Jenna Dewen-Tatum’s daughter
Everly and Alessandra Ambrosio’s son Noah. Clearly they
knows a good thing when she sees it.

Snake Species: Black Tiger Snake
Notechis ater ater

GLAUERT 1948

snake
http://media.eol.org/content/2012/02/21/01/08583_580_360.jpg

Higher Taxa Elapidae (Hydrophiinae), Alethinophidia, Serpentes, Squamata (snakes)

Subspecies Notechis scutatus scutatus (PETERS 1861)
Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948

Common Names E: Mainland Tiger Snake
scutatus: Eastern Tiger Snake
occidentalis: Western Tiger Snake
G: Östliche Tigerotter

E: ater: Black Tiger Snake, Krefft’s Tiger Snake
humphreysi: Tasmanian Tiger Snake
niger: Peninsular Tiger Snake
serventyi: Chappell Island Tiger Snake
G: Schwarze Tigerotter

Synonym Naja (Hamadryas) scutata PETERS 1861: 690
Alecto fasciolata JAN 1863: 117 (nom. nud. ?)
Hoplocephalus ater KREFFT 1866: 370
Alecto fasciolata JAN & SORDELLI 1873
Hoplocephalus fuscus STEINDACHNER 1867: 82
Notechis scutatus — BOULENGER 1896
Notechis scutatus niger KINGHORN 1921: 145
Notechis scutatus — KINGHORN 1924
Notechis scutatus ater — GLAUERT 1948
Notechis ater humphreysi WORRELL 1963
Notechis ater serventyi WORRELL 1963
Notechis ater — COGGER 1983: 229
Notechis scutatus — COGGER 1983: 229
Notechis scutatus — WELCH 1994: 93
Notechis ater — WELCH 1994: 93
Notechis ater — COGGER 2000: 659
Notechis scutatus — COGGER 2000: 660
Notechis scutatus — WILSON & SWAN 2010
Notechis scutatus — WALLACH et al. 2014: 488

Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948
Notechis scutatus occidentalis GLAUERT 1948
Notechis ater occidentalis — COGGER 2000: 659

Distribution Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria, Western Australia)

ater: Australia (Western Australia, South Australia,Tasmania);Flinders Ranges; Type locality: Flinders Range, S. A. (original register entry cites Port Lincoln, S. A. as the type locality).

niger: Kangaroo Island and other off-shore islands of South Australia.

humphreysi: King and nearby islands, Bass Strait.

occidentalis: SW West Australia.

Type locality: “Java” (in error)

snake knowledge
Education is the key. NOT eradication

Reproduction Viviparous. Tiger snakes give birth to 20 to 30 live young; an exceptional record was made of 64 from an eastern female. They usually mate in spring when it is in the warmer seasons and will give birth to live young in summer.

Types Holotype: ZMB 2815, presumed lost (Naja (Hamadryas) scutata PETERS 1862)
Syntypes: probably MSNM, not located, from Australia [Alecto fasciolata JAN 1863].
Syntypes: not found, from Australia [Hoplocephalus fuscus].
Holotype: WAM R9430, from unspecified locality, but collector from Bassendean, W. A. [Notechis scutatus occidentalis].
Holotype: AM 6577 [ater]
Holotype: AM R7124, from Deep Creek, 20 mi from Kingscote, Kangaroo Is., S. A. [Notechis scutatus niger].
Holotype: AM R17955, from New Year Is. near King Is., Bass Strait, Tasmania [Notechis ater humphreysi].
Holotype: AM R17953, from Chappell Is., Furneaux Group, Bass Strait, Tasmania [Notechis ater serventyi].

Synonymy: KEOGH et al. (2005) synonymized N. ater with N. scutatus. Previously, Notechis scutatus niger has been renamed Notechis ater niger. Synonymy partly after Rawlinson 1991.

Diet: Adult mainland snakes feed on frogs and mice, whereas adult island snakes mostly take silver-gull chicks.

Venomous!

Type species: Naja scutata PETERS 1861: 690 is the type species of the genus Notechis BOULENGER 1896.

Etymology Etymology (ater): Named after its color, Latin “ater, atra, atrum” = dark or black.

Tiger snakes are a type of venomous snake found in southern regions of Australia, including its coastal islands and Tasmania. These snakes are highly variable in their colour, often banded like those on a tiger, and forms in their regional occurrences. All populations are in the genus Notechis, and their diverse characters have been described in further subdivisions of this group; they are sometimes described as distinct species and/or subspecies.

Notechis is a genus of large venomous snake in the family Elapidae restricted to subtropical and temperate regions of Australia. Tiger snakes are a large group of distinct populations, which may be isolated or overlapping, with extreme variance in size and colour. Individuals also show seasonal variation in colour. The total length can be up to 2.9 m (10 ft). The patterning is darker bands, strongly contrasting or indistinct, which are pale to very dark in colour. Colouration is composed of olive, yellow, orange-brown, or jet-black, and the underside of the snake is light yellow or orange. The tiger snake uses venom to dispatch its prey, and may bite an aggressor; they are potentially fatal to humans. Tolerant of low temperatures, the snake may be active on warmer nights. When threatened, they flatten their bodies and raise their heads above the ground in a classic prestrike stance.

Tiger snakes are found in coastal environments, wetlands, and creeks where they often form territories. Areas with an abundance of prey can support large populations. The species’ distribution extends from the south of Western Australia through to South Australia, Tasmania,including Savage River National Park up through Victoria, and New South Wales. Its common habitat includes the coastal areas of Australia.

The genus Notechis is placed in the family of elapid snakes. The two extensively recognized species of this genus are Notechis scutatus (Peters, 1861) and Notechis ater (Krefft, 1866), which show further variety in their characteristics. Several authors have published revisions or described subspecies of these species. Others consider the names contained by this taxonomic arrangement to be unwarranted, and describe Notechis as a monotypic genus.[4] Various authorities accept some or all the systematics previously applied, but most agree a revision of the genus is needed. Names for these subdivisions include the western types, appended to both species names as occidentalis (Glauert 1948) The island groups have also been described as subspecies: Chappell Island tiger snake as N. ater serventyi (Warrell, 1963), King Island and Tasmanian tiger snakes subspecies as N. ater humphreysi, (Warrell, 1963) and the Peninsula tiger snake as N. ater niger (Kinghorn 1921).

Tiger snake venoms possess potent neurotoxins, coagulants, haemolysins and myotoxins. Symptoms of a bite include localized pain in the foot and neck region, tingling, numbness, and sweating, followed by a fairly rapid onset of breathing difficulties and paralysis. In a study, the untreated mortality rate from its bites is reported to be between 40 and 60%.

Treatment is the same for all Australian venomous snakes. The pressure immobilization method is used to inhibit the flow of venom through the lymphatic system. Broad, thick bandages are applied over the bite, then down and back along the limb to the armpit or groin. The affected limb is then immobilized with a splint. Identification of the venom is possible if traces are left near the wound. Identifying the snake is not necessary if bitten in Tasmania, however, as the same antivenom is used to treat all Tasmanian snakes’ bites. The availability of antivenom has greatly reduced the incidence of fatal tiger snake bites. Among the number of deaths caused by snakebite in Australia, the deaths from tiger snake are exceeded by the brown snake.

In most Australian states, they are protected species, and to kill or injure one incurs a fine up to $7,500, as well as a jail sentence of 18 months in some states. It is also illegal to export a native Australian snake.

The subspecies Notechis ater ater, found away from mainland Australia, is typically uniformly black.

As with most snakes, the colours vary widely between individuals and are an unreliable means of identifying subspecies. Accurate identification is best performed with a venom test kit or scale count.
In the past, two species of tiger snakes were commonly recognised: the Eastern Tiger Snake Notechis scutatus, and the so-called Black Tiger Snake Notechis ater. However, morphological differences between the two appear inconsistent, and recent molecular studies have shown N. ater and N. scutatus to be genetically similar, hence it would seem that there is now just one wide-ranging species that varies greatly in size and colouration – Notechis scutatus.

Despite this recent revision, the old classification is still in popular use and a number of subspecies are also recognised:
• Notechis ater ater – Krefft’s Tiger Snake (Flinders Ranges, South Australia)
• Notechis ater humphreysi – Tasmanian Tiger Snake (King Is. and Tasmania)
• Notechis ater niger – Peninsular Tiger Snake (lower Eyre and Yorke Peninsulas, offshore islands of South Australia)
• Notechis ater serventyi – Chappell Island Tiger Snake (Furneaux Group, Bass Strait)
• Notechis scutatus occidentalis (sometimes N. ater occidentalis) – Western Tiger Snake (southwest corner of Western Australia)
• Notechis scutatus scutatus – Eastern Tiger Snake (southeastern mainland Australia)

Most Australians know of tiger snakes and are aware of their fearsome reputation, though few people will ever encounter one. Unfortunately this species is much maligned because of its aggressive nature and toxic venom; however the tiger snake should be recognised as a great survivor, superbly adapted to some of the most inhospitable environments in Australia.
snake for heavens sake

The common name refers to the prominent yellow and black cross-bands typical of some populations of tiger snakes, however not all have this pattern. The most commonly seen form is dark olive brown to blackish-brown, with off-white to yellowish cross-bands that can vary in thickness. Entirely patternless individuals may occur in banded populations, and these types range in colour from yellowish-brown to black. Some populations consist of almost entirely unbanded individuals, e.g. those of the central highlands and southwest of Tasmania. Melanism (dark body colouration) is most strongly developed in populations exposed to highly variable weather conditions and cool extremes, such as those experienced at higher altitudes or on offshore islands. The dark colouration is an adaptation that allows those snakes to absorb heat at a faster rate during the short growing season.

The head is moderately wide and deep and only slightly distinct from the robust, muscular body. The neck and upper body can be flattened to a considerable degree when performing a threat display, exposing the black skin between the relatively large, semi-glossy scales.

Midbody scales 17-21 rows, ventral scales 140-190, single anal and subcaudal scales. A large squarish frontal shield, not or scarcely longer than broad, is characteristic of Notechis.

Total length varies between populations, ranging from 100cm (Roxby Island, South Australia) to 240cm (Chappell Island, Bass Strait). The average total length for mainland tiger snakes is around 1.2m, although they may reach up to 2.1m. In general, males appear to attain a larger size than females.

Tiger snakes have a non-continuous distribution within two broad areas; southeastern Australia (including the islands of Bass Strait and Tasmania), and southwestern Australia.

Krefft’s Tiger Snake (Flinders Ranges) can be distinguished from other tiger snakes by its small size, black colouration, number of scales and venom colour (Ehmann 1992). The Krefft’s Tiger Snake (Flinders Ranges) has a dark brown to black coloured body, light to very dark grey coloured belly and smooth scales (Cogger 2000). Faint darker or lighter cross-bands are often visible along the body, particularly in juveniles. The Krefft’s Tiger Snake (Flinders Ranges) reaches a maximum length of 1.2 m, and female adults are larger than males (Ehmann 1992; Mirtschin & Bailey 1990).

Krefft’s tiger snake (Flinders Ranges) is confined to several stream systems in the southern Flinders Ranges, South Australia (SA). It occurs in Mount Remarkable National Park (NP), Doughby Reserve south-east of Melrose, Spring Creek and Cannons Swamp north of Melrose, and the mouth of the Broughton River south of Port Pirie (Cogger et al. 1993). The southern-most limit of the subspecies is likely to be Crystal Brook (Broughton River) (Ehmann 1992).
Anecdotal reports suggest that the subspecies may have occurred in the northern Flinders Ranges, with unconfirmed sightings from Arkaba Station and Wilpena Pound Creek (Mirtschin & Bailey 1990). There are also unconfirmed sightings in the Rocky River catchment (Graham et al. 2001), which may link the Broughton River and the southern Flinders Ranges subpopulations.
The subspecies is generally considered rare and highly seasonal (Duffield 2000). It may have experienced declines since the late 1980s (i.e. Mirtschin & Bailey 1990) due to the drying of permanent waterholes (Duffield 2000).

The age of sexual maturity in Krefft’s tiger snake (Flinders Ranges) is likely to be 2-3 years. In captivity, a female tiger snake lived for 13 years and 4 months (Bush 1994). In captivity, female Tiger snakes are capable of reproducing successfully once per year for five successive years (Bush 1994). Young are born alive and litters of 8 and 15 young have been recorded (Mirtchin & Bailey 1990). Elsewhere the average litter size of tiger snakes is 20-30 young (Cogger et al. 2003), however, litters of up to 109 have been recorded (Cogger 2014). Juvenile mortality rates are likely to be high, except when competition for food resources is low. Mating occurs in spring and young are born in mid-late summer (Mirtschin & Bailey 1990).

References Aubret, F. and R. Shine 2009. Genetic Assimilation and the Postcolonization Erosion of Phenotypic Plasticity in Island Tiger Snakes. Current Biology 19 (22): 1932-1936
Aubret, Fabien; Bonnet, Xavier; Shine, Richard; Maumelat, Stéphanie 2005. Swimming and pregnancy in Tiger snakes, Notechis scutatus. Amphibia-Reptilia 26 (3): 396-400
Aubret, Fabien; Michniewicz, Radika J. 2010. Warming up for cold water: influence of habitat type on thermoregulatory tactics in a semi-aquatic snake. Amphibia-Reptilia 31 (4): 525-531
Aubret, Fabien; Richard Shine & Xavier Bonnet 2004. Adaptive developmental plasticity in snakes. Nature 431: 261
Baehr, M. 1976. Beiträge zur Verbreitung und Ökologie tasmanischer Reptilien. Stuttgarter Beitr. Naturk. (A) 292: 1-24
Clear, Rhian C. 2011. Notechis scutatus (tiger snake) predation. Herpetological Review 42 (3): 442
Cogger, H. G. 2014. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia, 7th ed. CSIRO Publishing, xxx + 1033 pp.
Cogger, H.G. 2000. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia, 6th ed. Ralph Curtis Publishing, Sanibel Island, 808 pp.
Fabien, A., X. Bonnet, S. Maumelat, D. Bradshaw and T. Schwaner 2004. Diet divergence, jaw size and scale counts in two neighbouring populations of tiger snakes (Notechis scutatus). Amphibia-Reptilia 25 (1): 9-17
Fearn, Simon 1993. The tiger snake Notechis scutatus (Serpentes: Elapidae) in Tasmania. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 23 (2): 17-29
Fearn, Simon 1994. Tiger snakes in Tasmania. Monitor: Bulletin of the Victorian Herpetological Society Inc. 5 (3): 121-130
Fearn, Simon 1995. Tiger snakes in Tazmania. Litteratura Serpentium 15 (5): 118-122
Glauert, L. 1948. A western tiger snake, Notechis scutatus occidentalis, subsp. nov. Western Australian Naturalist 1: 139-141
Gomard, Guillaume 2015. Tigerottern: eine Einladung zum Kennenlernen der Reptilien Tasmaniens. Terraria Elaphe 2015 (4): 44-51
Gower, D.; Garrett, K. & Stafford, P. 2012. Snakes. Firefly Books, Buffalo, NY,
144 p..
Hutchinson, M.N. 1979. The reptiles of Kinglake National Park. Victorian Naturalist 96: 124-134
Jan, G. & Sordelli, F. 1873. Iconographie Générale des Ophidiens. Atlas 1860-1881. Milan: Jan & Sordelli, 50 livr.
Jan,G. 1863. Elenco Sistematico degli Ofidi descriti e disegnati per l’Iconografia Generale. Milano, A. Lombardi. vii + 143 pp.
Kinghorn, J. R. 1921. Studies in Australian reptiles. 2. Rec. Austral. Mus. 13: 143-154
Kinghorn, J. Roy 1924. Reptiles and batrachians from south and south-west Australia. Rec. Austral. Mus. 14 (3): 163-183
Krefft, G. 1866. Descriptions of three species of snakes of the genus Hoplocephalus. Proc. Zool. Soc. London 1866: 370-371
Mattison, Chris 2007. The New Encyclopedia of Snakes. Princeton University Press
Michael, D.R.; D.B. Lindenmayer; M. Crane; C. MacGregor; R. Montague-Drake; L. McBurney. 2011. Reptilia, Murray catchment, New South Wales, southeastern Australia. Check List 7 (1):25-29
Mirtschin, P. J., Bailey, N. 1990. A study of the Kreffts Black Tiger Snake Notechis ater ater (Reptilia : Elapidae ). The S. A. Naturalist 64 (3): 52-99.
Murphy, Michael J. 1994. Reptiles and amphibians of Seven Mile Beach National park, NSW. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 24 (2): 24-30
Peters, Wilhem Carl Hartwig 1861. Eine zweite Übersicht (vergl. Monatsberichte 1859 p. 269) der von Hrn. F. Jagor auf Malacca, Java, Borneo und den Philippinen gesammelten und dem Kgl. zoologischen Museum übersandten Schlangen. Monatsber. königl. Akad. Wiss. Berlin. 1861 (Juli): 683-691 [1862 on title page]
Rawlinson P A 1991. Taxonomy and distribution of the Australian tiger snakes (Notechis) and copperheads (Austrelaps) (Serpentes, Elapidae). ROYAL SOCIETY OF VICTORIA PROCEEDINGS 103 (2): 125-135
Rawlinson, P. A. 1974. Biogeography and ecology of the reptiles of Tasmania and the Bass Strait area. In: Williams, W. D. (ed.) Biogeography and Ecology in Tasmania,Chapt. 11. The Hague: Junk, pp. 291-338
Schwaner, T. D. 1984. The identity of red-bellied black snakes on Kangaroo Island. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia 108:137
Schwaner, Terry D. 1990. Geographic variation in scale and skeletal anomalies of tiger snakes (Elapidae: Notechis scutatus-ater complex) in southern Australia. Copeia 1990 (4): 1168-1173
Schwaner,T.D. & Sarre,S.D. 1990. Body size and sexual dimorphism in Mainand and Island Tiger Snakes. Journal of Herpetology 24 (3): 320-322
Seung Hoon, Cha 2012. Snake, the world most beautifull curve [in Korean]. Hownext, 304 pp. [ISBN 978-89-965656-7-3]
Shine, R. 1977. Habitats, diets, and sympatry in snakes: a study from Australia. Can. J. Zool. 55: 1118-1128
Steindachner, F. 1867. In: Reise der Österreichischen Fregatte Novara um die Erde in den Jahren 1857, 1858,1859 unter den Befehlen des Commodore B. von Wüllerstorf-Urbair (Zoologie), Vol. 1, part 3 (Reptilien p.1-98). K. Gerold’s Sohn/Kaiserlich-Königl. Hof- und Staatsdruckerei, Wien [1869 on title page]
Taylor, R. J.;Dudley, A.;Gale, P. G. 1993. Reptiles and amphibians in sclerophyll forest surrounding Old Chum Dam in north-eastern Tasmania. Herpetofauna (Sydney) 23 (1): 26-31
Wilson, S. & Swan, G. 2010. A complete guide to reptiles of Australia, 3rd ed. Chatswood: New Holland, 558 pp.
Worrell, E. 1963. Two new subspecies of the elapine genus Notechis from Bass Strait. Aust. Rept. Park Rec. 2: 2-11
Worrell, Eric 1994. Tiger snake island. Monitor: Bulletin of the Victorian Herpetological Society Inc. 5 (3): 97-112

snake
http://whatsnakeisthat.com.au/images/stories/Elapids/notechis%20atar2ww.jpg

Image
Little scorpion.com

HeatAndCool.com

**NB. Photos used are for educational purposes. No photos are mine. If you own one of them and would like it removed please message me.

Snake: Newlyweds give each other pythons

Snake: Newlyweds give each other pythons

fye.com
Shopping with us is easy. Our goal is to provide an
excellent customer experience and to ensure your
satisfaction.

 

Snake: Newlyweds give each other pythons as wedding gifts

Posted by Tolu Unusual

snake
https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1Md3hosehJo/V9438Zf6MbI/AAAAAAADHs8/QWYaA6NjNEwIaLlAtxCLGXdeFGHpXu_twCLcB/s1600/b083fe955fd619471b6e5c.jpg

A newly-wed couple in Northeast China gave each other snakes at a wedding ceremony.

Wu Jianfeng, the groom, married Jiang Xue Friday in Jinlin city of Jilin province. At the wedding ceremony, the bride Jiang gave a 15-kg female Burmese python to the groom, who in turn gave the bride a 30-kg male Burmese pytho,the China Daily reports.

The Burmese python is one of the five largest species of snakes in the world.

It is reported that the couple are animal rights activists and bred many rare species at home, including spiders, lizards, pythons and birds. They came to rescue wounded animals many times.

snake
https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ZsgwnsQqtTs/V944CF5mVzI/AAAAAAADHtA/xFddajjjOkA-VpQbpes5AoS0I158Ng-ygCLcB/s1600/b083fe955fd619471b6e5b.jpg
snake
https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-QXWZxXum2Vs/V9430hUVmVI/AAAAAAADHs4/vRbDX9DZY6Q8aVkslDnzRfcfYwpxRdMTwCLcB/s1600/b083fe955fd619471b6e58.jpg

Source: http://toluunusual.blogspot.co.nz/2016/09/newlyweds-give-each-other-pythons-as.html

**NB. Photos used are for educational purposes. No photos are mine. If you own one of them and would like it removed please message me.

Snake smugglers: Rare two-headed boa rescued

Snake smugglers: Rare two-headed boa snake rescued in Karnataka

Crowdfunding your Legal Case at Funded Justice
Funded Justice is a crowdfunding community for anyone
with a legal issue that needs money to hire an attorney.

Snake smugglers: Rare two-headed boa snake rescued in Karnataka

Chaitanya Swamy H M | Bangalore Mirror Bureau

Chikkajala police have arrested four persons and have rescued a rare two-headed red sand boa, said to be worth more than Rs 1 crore in the illegal wildlife trade market. Police claimed that all four arrested were middlemen in a major smuggling racket involving rare animals. They would buy snakes from catchers and supply them to agents, who, in turn, would strike hefty deals from buyers. The rescued reptile was later released into the Bannerghatta National Park, in the presence of forest department officials, on Monday. The two-headed red sand boa is considered good luck charm, and used in black magic rituals in India. It is also in demand for its medicinal value in some Asian countries.

According to the Chikkajala police, they received a tip-off at around 4.30 pm on Sunday afternoon that a gang was trying to strike a deal for a two-headed red sand boa in Army Layout near Venkateshwara College. A team of officials, including some plainclothesmen, was assembled to pose as potential customers. The accused were found inside a private vehicle trying to strike a deal with their prospective customers. The decoys approached them and struck a deal to buy the creature for Rs 1 lakh.

Soon, they signalled to their colleagues to arrest the accused. The arrested have been identified as Munikrishna (28), Gopala (22), Punith (21) and Karthik (18). These snakes are largely found in Bagepalli and Mulabagal of Kolar, and Sira in Tumakuru besides other places in the state.

“We managed to nab the gang at the first level of illegal transport. Two-headed snakes are sold for Rs 1 crore. Buyers believe these bring good luck, virility and protection from enemies. These snakes are also smuggled out to countries like Japan, Malaysia, Singapore and China. International markets fetch greater value for the smugglers than local ones,” said PS Harsha, deputy commissioner of police (north-east).

Meanwhile, Chikkjala police was entrusted with the safe custody of the rare snake for almost 24 hours until wildlife officials took over and released it back into the wild. Forest officials had instructed the policemen to feed the snake a high-protein diet, mainly egg whites, at regular intervals. A case has been registered against the accused under the Wildlife Protection Act and IPC section 420 (cheating).

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bengaluru/Rare-two-headed-boa-snake-rescued-in-Karnataka/articleshow/54537226.cms

Snake wrapped around armrest halts train

Snake wrapped around armrest halts Japanese ‘bullet’ train

Snake wrapped around armrest halts Japanese ‘bullet’ train
By Associated Press

TOKYO (AP) – A passenger spotted a snake curled around the armrest of another passenger’s seat on a Japanese high-speed Shinkansen “bullet” train, forcing the train to make an unscheduled stop.

No one was injured in the incident Monday.

The train’s operator, JR Tokai, said the passenger sitting in the reserved seat was unaware that the snake was wrapped around the armrest for about 50 minutes until the person behind him saw it and notified a conductor.

The super-express train made an unscheduled stop at Hamamatsu station and railway police removed the snake in about a minute.

It said the train left the station and arrived in Hiroshima, its destination, on time.

Source: http://wfla.com/2016/09/26/python-wrapped-around-armrest-halts-japanese-bullet-train/

**NB. Photos used are for educational purposes. No photos are mine. If you own one of them and would like it removed please message me.

Snake Species: Apostolepis cerradoensis


Over 1200 Titles to chose from

Snake Species: Apostolepis cerradoensis

DE LEMA 2003

 

snake 10 no kill
Most snake bites happen when people try to catch or kill smakes

Higher Taxa Colubridae (Dipsadinae), Colubroidea, Caenophidia, Alethinophidia, Serpentes, Squamata (snakes)

Synonym Apostolepis cerradoensis DE LEMA 2003
Apostolepis cerradoensis — WALLACH et al. 2014: 50

Distribution Brazil (Goiás)

Type locality: caneiro de obras da barragem da Usina Hidreléctrica Serra da Mesa Minaçu, Goiás, Brazil.

Reproduction oviparous

Types Holotype: UHESM 21800, male

References Lema, T. de 2003. Descrição de nova espécie de Apostolepis Cope do cerrado do Brasil, pertencente ao grupo dimidiata (Serpentes, Elapomorphinae). Acta Biologica Leopoldensia 25 (1): 123-131

Image
More snake info

Iolo technologies, LLC
 

**NB. Photos used are for educational purposes. No photos are mine. If you own one of them and would like it removed please message me.

Snake Species: Apostolepis breviceps


Often made from cast stone, fountains are perfect for
adding a focal point to your landscape, patio, or yard. In
many cases, Large commercial size fountains are often
placed in town centers, large backyards, hotel and
business courtyards and bring a sense of serenity that can
help shield road or background noise. Our fountains range
from cast stone to fiberglass, ceramic, stainless steel,
copper and many other materials.

Snake Species: Apostolepis breviceps

HARVEY, GONZALES & SCROCCHI, 2001

snakes 9 what's the difference
They are all living creatures

Higher Taxa Colubridae (Dipsadinae), Colubroidea, Caenophidia, Alethinophidia, Serpentes, Squamata (snakes)

Synonym Apostolepis breviceps HARVEY, GONZALES & SCROCCHI, 2001
Apostolepis breviceps — WALLACH et al. 2014: 50

Distribution S Bolivia (Gran Chaco)

Type locality: “vicinity of Cerro Cortado (i.e., within 5 km), Cordillera Province, Santa Cruz Department, Bolivia, 19°32’S, 62°18’W. Elevation at the Type locality is approximately 400 m.”

Reproduction oviparous

Types Holotype: MNK (= NK) 1839, a 319 mm male (G. Soto Q., 16 Feb. 1999).

Etymology Named after Latin “brevis, -e” = short and “-ceps”, a short form of “caput” = head.

References HARVEY, M. B., L. GONZALES A. & G. J. SCROCCHI 2001. New species of Apostolepis (Squamata: Colubridae) from Gran Chaco in Southern Bolivia. Copeia 2001 (2): 501-507

Image
More snake info

Iolo technologies, LLC
 

**NB. Photos used are for educational purposes. No photos are mine. If you own one of them and would like it removed please message me.

Snake Education and Information all you want to know about snakes