Category Archives: Music

Telecaster® Setup Guide

Telecaster® Setup Guide

Source: http://intl.fender.com/en-NZ/support/articles/telecaster-setup-guide/

 

TELECASTER® ADJUSTMENT AND CARE

The following setup procedures and specifications are for your Telecaster as equipped with the strings that come on the instrument as standard equipment from the factory. If you plan to change string gauges, you may need to adjust the specs somewhat to compensate for the changes in string sizes. Modifications of the specs may also be made (within limited parameters) to adjust for your individual playing style or application (i.e., how hard you pick, strum or fret the guitar).

Note: These are minimum specifications that are meant as a guide; they should not be construed as hard and fast rules, as we realize that every player’s subjective requirements often differ.

TOOLS NEEDED

  • Set of automotive feeler gauges (.002-.025) (0.05–1 mm)
  • 6″ (150 mm) ruler (with 1/32″ and 1/64″ increments) (0.5 mm increments)
  • Light machine oil (3-in-1, toy locomotive or gun oil)
  • Phillips screwdriver
  • Electronic tuner
  • Wire cutters
  • Peg winder
  • Polish and cloth

STRINGS

For strings to stay in tune, they should be changed regularly. Strings that have lost their integrity (worn where pressed against the fret) or have become oxidized, rusty and dirty will not return to pitch properly. To check if your strings need changing, run a finger underneath the string and feel for dirt, rust or flat spots. If you find any of these, you should change your strings.

No matter what gauge of strings you use, for the best tuning stability we recommend using Fender strings, which are designed to provide superior performance. Make sure to stretch your strings properly. After you’ve installed and tuned a new set, hold the strings at the first fret and hook your fingers under each string, one at a time, and tug lightly, moving your hand from the bridge to the neck. Re-tune and repeat several times.

TUNING KEYS

How you wind the strings onto the pegs is very important, whether you’re using locking, standard or vintage tuning keys. Start by loading all the strings through the bridge and then loading them onto the keys as follows:

Locking tuning keys. Picture the headcap of the neck as the face of a clock, with the top being 12:00 and the nut being 6:00. Line the six tuning machines so that the first string keyhole is set at 1:00, the second at 2:00, the third and fourth at 3:00, the fifth at 4:00, and the sixth at 5:00. Pull the strings through tautly and tighten the thumb wheel, locking the string in. Now tune to pitch.

Standard keys. To reduce string slippage at the tuning key, we recommend using a tie technique. This is done by pulling the string through the keyhole and then pulling it clockwise underneath and back over itself; creating a knot. You’ll need to leave a bit of slack for the first string so you have at least two or three winds around the post. As you progress to the sixth string, you’ll reduce the amount of slack and the number of winds around the keys.

Vintage keys. For these, you’ll want to pre-cut the strings to achieve the proper length and desired amount of winds. Pull the sixth string (tautly, remember) to the fourth key and cut it. Pull the fifth string to the third key and cut it. Pull the fourth string between the second and first keys and cut it. Pull the third string nearly to the top of the headcap and cut it. Pull the second string about a 1/2″ (13 mm) past the headcap and cut it. Finally, pull the first string 1 1/2″ (38 mm) past the top of the headcap and cut it. Insert into the center hole in the tuning key, bend and crimp to a 90-degree angle, and wind neatly in a downward pattern, being careful to prevent overlapping of the strings.

If your tuning keys have a screw on the end of the button, check the tightness of the screw. This controls the tension of the gears inside the tuning keys. Do not over-tighten these screws. They should be “finger-tight.” This is very important, especially on locking tuners.

BRIDGE

Telecasters can have two distinctive types of bridges. The most well-known type is the vintage-style three-section bridge. The other is the modern-day six-section bridge, such as the American Standard Telecaster bridge. Check your tuning before proceeding with intonation.

INTONATION (ROUGHING IT OUT)

You can preset the basic intonation of your guitar by taking a tape measure and measuring from the inside of the nut to the center of the 12th fret (the fret wire itself; not the fingerboard). Double that measurement to find the scale length of your guitar.

For a vintage three-section bridge, a series of adjustments must be made to compensate for the lack of individual string intonation. Adjust the first bridge saddle to the scale length, measuring from the inside of the nut to the center of the bridge saddle.

Now adjust the distance of the second saddle back from the first saddle, using the combination of the gauges of the second and third strings as a measurement. For example, if the second string is .011″ (0.3 mm) and the third is .013″ (0.35 mm), you would move the second saddle back .024″ (0.65 mm) from the first saddle. Move the third saddle back from the second saddle, using the gauge of the fifth and sixth strings as a measurement.

For the six-section bridge, you will make adjustments for each individual string. Adjust the first-string bridge saddle to the scale length, measuring from the inside of the nut to the center of the bridge saddle. Now adjust the distance of the second-string saddle back from the first saddle, using the gauge of the second string as a measurement. For example, If the second string is .011″ (0.3 mm), you would move the second-string saddle back .011″ (0.3 mm) from the first saddle. Move the third saddle back from the second saddle using the gauge of the third string as a measurement. The fourth-string saddle should be set parallel with the second-string saddle. Proceed with the fifth and sixth saddles with the same method used for strings two and three.

LUBRICATION AND STRING BREAKAGE

Lubricating all of the contact points of a string’s travel may be one of the most important elements in ensuring tuning stability and in reducing string breakage.

The main cause of string breakage is moisture collection at the point of contact on the bridge saddle. This can be attributed to the moisture and acidity that transfers from your hands, or it can be a direct effect of humidity in the air. Another factor is metal-to-metal friction and fatigue. Metal components react to each other over time because of their differences and help break down string integrity. A stronger metal will always attack a softer metal (this is why a stainless-steel string will wear a groove or burr in a vintage-style saddle). You’ll also find that different string brands break at different points of tension because of the metal makeup and string manufacturing techniques.

Since Fender manufactures its own strings, they are designed to perform well for all playing techniques.

One of the best ways to reduce string breakage is to lubricate the string/saddle contact point with a light machine oil (we prefer 3-in-1 oil because it contains anti-rust and anti-corrosive properties) every time you change strings. The oil insulates against moisture and reduces friction and metal fatigue. String trees are another point of contact and should also be lubricated; a small amount of lip balm applied with a toothpick works well.

TRUSS ROD

There are two different styles of truss rod found on Fender instruments—”standard” and “bi-flex” truss rods.

Most Fender guitars and basses are equipped with a standard truss rod (of which there are in turn two types: one that adjusts at the neck heel and one that adjusts at the headstock; both operate on the same principle). The standard truss rod can counteract concave curvature in a neck that has too much relief, for example, by generating a force in the neck opposite to that caused by excessive string tension.

Fender also uses a unique bi-flex truss rod system on some instruments. Unlike standard truss rods, which can only correct a neck that is too concave (under-bowed), the bi-flex truss rod can compensate concave or convex (over-bowed) curvature by generating a correcting force in either direction as needed.

First, check your tuning. Affix a capo at the first fret and depress the sixth string at the last fret. With a feeler gauge, check the gap between the bottom of the string and the top of the 8th fret—see the spec chart below for the proper gap..

Adjustment at headstock (allen wrench): Sight down the edge of the fingerboard from behind the headstock, looking toward the body of the instrument. If the neck is too concave (action too high), turn the truss rod nut clockwise to remove excess relief. If the neck is too convex (strings too close to the fingerboard), turn the truss rod nut counter-clockwise to allow the string tension to pull more relief into the neck. Check your tuning, then re-check the gap with the feeler gauge and re-adjust as needed.

Adjustment at neck joint (phillips screwdriver): Sight down the edge of the fingerboard from behind the body, looking up toward the headstock of the instrument. If the neck is too concave (action too high), turn the truss rod nut clockwise to remove excess relief. If the neck is too convex (strings too close to the fingerboard), turn the truss rod nut counter-clockwise to allow the string tension to pull more relief into the neck. Check your tuning, then re-check the gap with the feeler gauge and re-adjust as needed.

Note: In either case, if you meet excessive resistance when adjusting the truss rod, if your instrument needs constant adjustment, if adjusting the truss rod has no effect on the neck, or if you’re simply not comfortable making this type of adjustment yourself, take your instrument to your local Fender Authorized Dealer.
Neck Radius                 Relief
7.25″                                  .012″ (0.3 mm)
9.5″ to 12″                       .010″ (0.25 mm)
15″ to 17″                        .008″ (0.2 mm)

ACTION

Players with a light touch can get away with lower action; others need higher action to avoid rattles. First, check tuning. Using a 6″ (150 mm) ruler, measure the distance between bottom of strings and top of the 17th fret. Adjust bridge saddles to the height according to the chart, then re-tune. Experiment with the height until the desired sound and feel is achieved.

Neck Radius String Height Bass Side Treble Side
7.25″
9.5″ to 12″
15″ to 17″
5/64″ (2 mm)
4/64″ (1.6 mm)
4/64″ (1.6 mm)
4/64″ (1.6 mm)
4/64″ (1.6 mm)
3/64″ (1.2 mm)

SHIMMING/MICRO-TILT™ ADJUSTMENT

Shimming is a procedure used to adjust the pitch of the neck in relation to the body. A shim is placed in the neck pocket, underneath the butt end of the neck. On many American series guitars, a Micro-Tilt adjustment is offered. It replaces the need for a shim by using a hex screw against a plate installed in the butt end of the neck. The need to adjust the pitch (raising the butt end of the neck in the pocket, thereby pitching the neck back) of the neck occurs in situations where the string height is high and the action adjustment is as low as the adjustment will allow.

To properly shim a neck, the neck must be removed from the neck pocket of the body. A shim approximately 1/4″ (6.4 mm) wide by 1 3/4″ (44.5 mm) long by .010″ (0.25 mm) thick will allow you to raise the action approximately 1/32″ (0.8 mm). For guitars with the Micro-Tilt adjustment, loosen the two neck screws on both sides of the adjustment access hole on the neckplate by at least four full turns. Tightening the hex adjustment screw with an 1/8″ hex wrench approximately 1/4 turn will allow you to raise the action approximately 1/32″. Retighten the neck screws when the adjustment is complete. The pitch of the neck on your guitar has been preset at the factory and in most cases will not need to be adjusted.

Note: If you feel that this adjustment needs to be made and you’re not comfortable doing it yourself, take your guitar to your local Fender Authorized Dealer.

PICKUPS

Set too high, pickups can cause myriad inexplicable phenomena. Depress all the strings at the last fret. Using a 6″ (150 mm) ruler, measure the distance from the bottom of the first and sixth strings to the top of the pole piece. A good rule of thumb is that the distance should be greatest at the sixth-string neck pickup position, and closest at the first-string bridge pickup position. Follow the measurement guidelines in the chart below as starting points. The distance will vary according to the amount of magnetic pull from the pickup.

Bass Side Treble Side
Texas Specials 8/64″ (3.6 mm) 6/64″ (2.4 mm)
Vintage style 6/64″ (2.4 mm) 5/64″ (2 mm)
Noiseless™ Series 8/64″ (3.6 mm) 6/64″ (2.4 mm)
Standard Single-Coil 5/64″ (2 mm) 4/64″ (1.6 mm)
Humbuckers 4/64″ (1.6 mm) 4/64″ (1.6 mm)
Lace Sensors As close as desired (allowing for string vibration)

INTONATION (FINE TUNING)

Adjustments should be made after all of the above have been accomplished. Set the pickup selector switch in the middle position, and turn the volume and tone controls to their maximum settings. Check tuning. Check each string at the 12th fret, harmonic to fretted note (make sure you are depressing the string evenly to the fret, not the fingerboard). If sharp, lengthen the string by adjusting the saddle back. If flat, shorten the string by moving the saddle forward. Remember, guitars are tempered instruments! Re-tune, play and make further adjustments as needed.

Note: If you have a three-section-style bridge, compensate between the strings to minimize the percentage that any one string that may be sharp or flat. Listen for an aurally pleasing intonation.

ADDITIONAL HINTS

There are a few other things that you can do to optimize your tuning stability that have more to do with playing and tuning habits.

Each time you play your guitar, before you do your final tuning, play for a few minutes to allow the strings to warm up. Metal expands when warm and contracts when cool. After you’ve played a few riffs, you can then do your final tuning. Remember—with most tuning keys, it’s preferable to tune up to pitch. However, with locking tuners, go past the note and tune down to pitch. Finally, wipe the strings, neck and bridge with a lint-free cloth after playing. When transporting or storing your guitar, even for short periods, avoid leaving it anyplace you wouldn’t feel comfortable yourself.

 

Source:  http://intl.fender.com/en-NZ/support/articles/telecaster-setup-guide/

For more info, hint and tips visit Fender.com

For the Muso’s: How to set up your Strat..

Stratocaster® Setup Guide

STRATOCASTER® ADJUSTMENT AND CARE

The following setup procedures and specifications are for your Stratocaster as equipped with the strings that come on the instrument as standard equipment from the factory. If you plan to change string gauges, you may need to adjust the specs somewhat to compensate for the changes in string sizes. Modifications of the specs may also be made (within limited parameters) to adjust for your individual playing style or application (i.e., how hard you pick, strum or fret the guitar).

Note: These are minimum specifications that are meant as a guide; they should not be construed as hard and fast rules, as we realize that every player’s subjective requirements often differ.

TOOLS NEEDED

Set of automotive feeler gauges (.002-.025) (0.05–1 mm)
6″ (150 mm) ruler (with 1/32″ and 1/64″ increments) (0.5 mm increments)
Light machine oil (3-in-1, toy locomotive or gun oil)
Phillips screwdriver
Electronic tuner
Wire cutters
Peg winder
Polish and cloth

STRINGS

For strings to stay in tune, they should be changed regularly. Strings that have lost their integrity (worn where pressed against the fret) or have become oxidized, rusty and dirty will not return to pitch properly. To check if your strings need changing, run a finger underneath the string and feel for dirt, rust or flat spots. If you find any of these, you should change your strings.

No matter what gauge of strings you use, for the best tuning stability we recommend using Fender Bullet® strings. The patented bullet-end is specifically designed for all styles of tremolo use, from extreme dives to smooth vibrato passages. The design allows the string to travel freely in the bridge block channel during tremolo use and return afterwards to its original position, seated snugly in the bridge block. This is accomplished by eliminating the extra string wrap and the ball-end (the ball end doesn’t fit properly into the string channel). The bullet end has been shaped and sized to match the design of the bridge block channel.

Make sure to stretch your strings properly. After you’ve installed and tuned a new set, hold the strings at the first fret and hook your fingers under each string, one at a time, and tug lightly, moving your hand from the bridge to the neck. Re-tune and repeat several times.

TUNING KEYS

How you wind the strings onto the pegs is very important, whether you’re using locking, standard or vintage tuning keys. Start by loading all the strings through the bridge and then loading them onto the keys as follows:

Locking tuning keys. Picture the headcap of the neck as the face of a clock, with the top being 12:00 and the nut being 6:00. Line the six tuning machines so that the first string keyhole is set at 1:00, the second at 2:00, the third and fourth at 3:00, the fifth at 4:00, and the sixth at 5:00. Pull the strings through tautly and tighten the thumb wheel, locking the string in. Now tune to pitch.

Standard keys. To reduce string slippage at the tuning key, we recommend using a tie technique. This is done by pulling the string through the keyhole and then pulling it clockwise underneath and back over itself; creating a knot. You’ll need to leave a bit of slack for the first string so you have at least two or three winds around the post. As you progress to the sixth string, you’ll reduce the amount of slack and the number of winds around the keys.

Vintage keys. For these, you’ll want to pre-cut the strings to achieve the proper length and desired amount of winds. Pull the sixth string (tautly, remember) to the fourth key and cut it. Pull the fifth string to the third key and cut it. Pull the fourth string between the second and first keys and cut it. Pull the third string nearly to the top of the headcap and cut it. Pull the second string about a 1/2″ (13 mm) past the headcap and cut it. Finally, pull the first string 1 1/2″ (38 mm) past the top of the headcap and cut it. Insert into the center hole in the tuning key, bend and crimp to a 90-degree angle, and wind neatly in a downward pattern, being careful to prevent overlapping of the strings.

If your tuning keys have a screw on the end of the button, check the tightness of the screw. This controls the tension of the gears inside the tuning keys. Do not over-tighten these screws. They should be “finger-tight.” This is very important, especially on locking tuners.

TREMOLO

Stratocaster guitars can have four distinctive types of bridges. The most well-known bridge is the vintage-style “synchronized” tremolo. The other three are the American Series bridge, which is a modern-day two-pivot bridge; the non-tremolo hardtail bridge; and a locking tremolo, such as the American Deluxe or Floyd Rose® locking tremolos. If you have a non-tremolo “hardtail” bridge, proceed to “Intonation (Roughing it out).”

First, remove the tremolo back cover. Check your tuning. For a vintage-style tremolo bridge, a great way to enhance its performance is to pull the bridge back flush with the body using the tremolo arm. Then loosen all six screws located at the front edge of the bridge plate, raising them so that they all measure approximately 1/16″ (1.6 mm) above the top of the bridge plate. Then tighten the two outside screws back down until they’re flush with the top of the bridge plate. The bridge will now pivot on the outside screws, leaving the four inside screws in place for bridge stability. For a two-pivot model such as the American Series bridge, use your tremolo arm to pull the bridge back flush with the body and adjust the two pivot screws to the point where the tremolo plate sits entirely flush at the body (not lifted at the front or back of the plate).

Allowing the bridge to float freely (no tension on the tremolo arm) using the claw screws in the tremolo cavity, adjust the bridge to your desired angle—Fender spec is a 1/8″ (3.2 mm) gap at rear of bridge. You’ll need to retune periodically to get the right balance between the strings and the springs. If you prefer a bridge flush to the body, adjust spring tension to equal string tension, while the bridge rests on the body (you may want to put an extra 1/2 turn to each claw screw to ensure that the bridge remains flush to the body during string bends). Caution: Do not over-tighten the springs, as this can put unnecessary tension on the arm during tremolo use. Finally, you may wish to apply a small dab of Chapstick® or Vaseline® at the pivot contact points of the bridge for very smooth operation.

INTONATION (ROUGHING IT OUT)

You can preset the basic intonation of your guitar by taking a tape measure and measuring from the inside of the nut to the center of the 12th fret (the fret wire itself; not the fingerboard). Double that measurement to find the scale length of your guitar. Adjust the first-string bridge saddle to this scale length, measuring from the inside of the nut to the center of the bridge saddle. Now adjust the distance of the second-string saddle back from the first saddle, using the gauge of the second string as a measurement. For example, If the second string is .011″ (0.3 mm), you would move the second-string saddle back .011″ (0.3 mm) from the first saddle. Move the third saddle back from the second saddle using the gauge of the third string as a measurement. The fourth-string saddle should be set parallel with the second-string saddle. Proceed with the fifth and sixth saddles with the same method used for strings two and three.

LUBRICATION AND STRING BREAKAGE

Lubricating all of the contact points of a string’s travel may be one of the most important elements in ensuring tuning stability during tremolo use and in reducing string breakage.

The main cause of string breakage is moisture collection at the point of contact on the bridge saddle. This can be attributed to the moisture and acidity that transfers from your hands, or it can be a direct effect of humidity in the air. Another factor is metal-to-metal friction and fatigue. Metal components react to each other over time because of their differences and help break down string integrity. A stronger metal will always attack a softer metal (this is why a stainless-steel string will wear a groove or burr in a vintage-style saddle). You’ll also find that different string brands break at different points of tension because of the metal makeup and string manufacturing techniques.

Since Fender manufactures its own strings, they are designed to perform well during extreme tremolo techniques.

One of the best ways to reduce string breakage is to lubricate the string/saddle contact point with a light machine oil (we prefer 3-in-1 oil because it contains anti-rust and anti-corrosive properties) every time you change strings. The oil insulates against moisture and reduces friction and metal fatigue. String trees are another point of contact and should also be lubricated; a small amount of lip balm applied with a toothpick works well.

TRUSS ROD

There are two different styles of truss rod found on Fender instruments—”standard” and “bi-flex” truss rods.

Most Fender guitars and basses are equipped with a standard truss rod (of which there are in turn two types: one that adjusts at the neck heel and one that adjusts at the headstock; both operate on the same principle). The standard truss rod can counteract concave curvature in a neck that has too much relief, for example, by generating a force in the neck opposite to that caused by excessive string tension.

Fender also uses a unique bi-flex truss rod system on some instruments. Unlike standard truss rods, which can only correct a neck that is too concave (under-bowed), the bi-flex truss rod can compensate concave or convex (over-bowed) curvature by generating a correcting force in either direction as needed.

First, check your tuning. Affix a capo at the first fret and depress the sixth string at the last fret. With a feeler gauge, check the gap between the bottom of the string and the top of the 8th fret—see the spec chart below for the proper gap.

Adjustment at headstock (allen wrench): Sight down the edge of the fingerboard from behind the headstock, looking toward the body of the instrument. If the neck is too concave (action too high), turn the truss rod nut clockwise to remove excess relief. If the neck is too convex (strings too close to the fingerboard), turn the truss rod nut counter-clockwise to allow the string tension to pull more relief into the neck. Check your tuning, then re-check the gap with the feeler gauge and re-adjust as needed.

Adjustment at neck joint (phillips screwdriver): Sight down the edge of the fingerboard from behind the body, looking up toward the headstock of the instrument. If the neck is too concave (action too high), turn the truss rod nut clockwise to remove excess relief. If the neck is too convex (strings too close to the fingerboard), turn the truss rod nut counter-clockwise to allow the string tension to pull more relief into the neck. Check your tuning, then re-check the gap with the feeler gauge and re-adjust as needed.

Note: In either case, if you meet excessive resistance when adjusting the truss rod, if your instrument needs constant adjustment, if adjusting the truss rod has no effect on the neck, or if you’re simply not comfortable making this type of adjustment yourself, take your instrument to your local Fender Authorized Dealer.
Neck Radius                            Relief
7.25″                                             .012″ (0.3 mm)
9.5″ to 12″                                 .010″ (0.25 mm)
15″ to 17″                                  .008″ (0.2 mm)

ACTION

Players with a light touch can get away with lower action; others need higher action to avoid rattles. First, check tuning. Using a 6″ (150 mm) ruler, measure the distance between bottom of strings and top of the 17th fret. Adjust bridge saddles to the height according to the chart, then re-tune. Experiment with the height until the desired sound and feel is achieved.

Note: For locking tremolo systems, the individual string height is preset. Use the two pivot adjustment screws to achieve the desired overall string height.

Neck Radius String Height
Bass Side
Treble Side
7.25″
9.5″ to 12″
15″ to 17″
5/64″ (2 mm)
4/64″ (1.6 mm)
4/64″ (1.6 mm)
4/64″ (1.6 mm)

4/64″ (1.6 mm)
3/64″ (1.2 mm)

SHIMMING/MICRO-TILT™ ADJUSTMENT

Shimming is a procedure used to adjust the pitch of the neck in relation to the body. A shim is placed in the neck pocket, underneath the butt end of the neck. On many American series guitars, a Micro-Tilt adjustment is offered. It replaces the need for a shim by using a hex screw against a plate installed in the butt end of the neck. The need to adjust the pitch (raising the butt end of the neck in the pocket, thereby pitching the neck back) of the neck occurs in situations where the string height is high and the action adjustment is as low as the adjustment will allow.

To properly shim a neck, the neck must be removed from the neck pocket of the body. A shim approximately 1/4″ (6.4 mm) wide by 1 3/4″ (44.5 mm) long by .010″ (0.25 mm) thick will allow you to raise the action approximately 1/32″ (0.8 mm). For guitars with the Micro-Tilt adjustment, loosen the two neck screws on both sides of the adjustment access hole on the neckplate by at least four full turns. Tightening the hex adjustment screw with an 1/8″ hex wrench approximately 1/4 turn will allow you to raise the action approximately 1/32″. Re-tighten the neck screws when the adjustment is complete. The pitch of the neck on your guitar has been preset at the factory and in most cases will not need to be adjusted.

Note: If you feel that this adjustment needs to be made and you’re not comfortable doing it yourself, take your guitar to your local Fender Authorized Dealer.

PICKUPS

Set too high, pickups can cause myriad inexplicable phenomena. Depress all the strings at the last fret. Using a 6″ (150 mm) ruler, measure the distance from the bottom of the first and sixth strings to the top of the pole piece. A good rule of thumb is that the distance should be greatest at the sixth-string neck pickup position, and closest at the first-string bridge pickup position. Follow the measurement guidelines in the chart below as starting points. The distance will vary according to the amount of magnetic pull from the pickup.

Bass Side Treble Side
Texas Specials 8/64″ (3.2 mm) 6/64″ (2.4 mm)
Vintage style 6/64″ (2.4 mm) 5/64″ (2 mm)
Noiseless™ Series 8/64″ (3.2 mm) 6/64″ (2.4 mm)
Standard Single-Coil 5/64″ (2 mm) 4/64″ (1.6 mm)
Humbuckers 4/64″ (1.6 mm) 4/64″ (1.6 mm)
Lace Sensors As close as desired (allowing for string vibration)

INTONATION (FINE TUNING)

Adjustments should be made after all of the above have been accomplished. Set the pickup selector switch in the middle position, and turn the volume and tone controls to their maximum settings. Check tuning. Check each string at the 12th fret, harmonic to fretted note (make sure you are depressing the string evenly to the fret, not the fingerboard). If sharp, lengthen the string by adjusting the saddle back. If flat, shorten the string by moving the saddle forward. Remember, guitars are tempered instruments! Re-tune, play and make further adjustments as needed.
ADDITIONAL HINTS

There are a few other things that you can do to optimize your tuning stability that have more to do with playing and tuning habits.

Each time you play your guitar, before you do your final tuning, play for a few minutes to allow the strings to warm up. Metal expands when warm and contracts when cool. After you’ve played a few riffs and done a few dive-bombs, you can then do your final tuning. Remember—with most tuning keys, it’s preferable to tune up to pitch. However, with locking tuners, go past the note and tune down to pitch. Finally, wipe the strings, neck and bridge with a lint-free cloth after playing. When transporting or storing your guitar, even for short periods, avoid leaving it anyplace you wouldn’t feel comfortable yourself.

Source: http://intl.fender.com/en-NZ/support/articles/stratocaster-setup-guide/

For more helpful hints and tips visit Fender.com

Rock stars: Do they fit the image?

Teachers often get a bad rap from rock-and-roll, dating back to “School Days” by Chuck Berry on through “School’s Out” by Alice Cooper, “Another Brick in the Wall” by Pink Floyd, and both hit versions of “Smokin’ in the Boys Room” by Brownsville Station and Mötley Crüe.

10 Songs About Wanting to Sleep With Your Teacher

But what happens when the instructor in front of the classroom is actually a rock star? In some cases, they’re up-and-comers who teach by day and jam by night; in others, they’re established figures who return to school to share their unique knowledge.

So with school back in session, here’s a salute to ten major musicians who (at least) once stepped off stage and rocked a chalkboard.

Gene Simmons

For a brief spell in the early 1970s, Gene Simmons—AKA the fire-breathing Demon bassist of Kiss—taught sixth grade at P.S. 75 in New York City’s Spanish Harlem.

“The reason I quit after six months,” Simmons revealed, “is that I discovered the real reason I became a teacher. It was because I wanted to get up on stage and have people notice me. I had to quit because the stage was too small. Forty people wasn’t enough. I wanted 40,000.”

In 2005, Simmons hopped the pond to star in the UK reality TV show, Gene Simmons’ Rock School, where the God of Thunder was challenged, a la the beloved Jack Black movie School of Rock, to transform a classroom full of kids into a high-powered rock-and-roll ensemble.
Sting

Future Police frontman Gordon Sumner, better known as Sting, taught elementary English from 1974 to 1976 at St. Paul’s First School in Northeastern English town of Cramlington.

“When I got my degree, I became a teacher,” Sting said in 2003, “but deep down, that’s not what I wanted to be. Somehow, God smiled on me, [saying] ‘It’s your turn, you can have a hit record.’”

Among those hit records was “Don’t Stand So Close To Me,” Sting’s imaging of what challenges he might have faced had he taught higher grades instead, with classes teeming with the exact sort of teenage female fans who went so mad for the Police.
Brian May

Rock fans know and worship Brian May as the brilliant guitar virtuoso of Queen. Scientists know and respect him as a brilliant astrophysicist who, most recently, worked with the NASA team that launched a flyby of Pluto.

Back in 1971, however, secondary school math and science students at South London’s Stockwell Manor knew and learned from Brian May as their teacher.

“It was very challenging,” May said of his teaching gig. “You couldn’t get the children to attend unless they were incredibly interested in what you were saying. I had an advantage because I was young and could speak to them in their own language.”

May says he enjoyed the job, except for one class when passed out scissors to be used to cut out shapes. “Half an hour later they were attacking each other,” May recalls, “blood and paper everywhere!”
Paul Simon

Just after Simon and Garfunkel parted ways in the wake of Bridge Over Troubled Water’s mega-success, NYU invited Paul Simon in 1971 to head up a songwriting workshop on their campus.

Students had to audition to take the course. Among those who made the cut were cult New York singers Maggie and Terre Roche of the Roches, and future pop star Melissa Manchester, who enjoyed the class, and recalls Simon being a little nervous. Manchester herself is now a music professor at USC.
Art Garfunkel

During the interpersonally tumultuous period leading up his partner Paul Simon taking professorial residence at NYU, Art Garfunkel completed coursework toward a PhD in mathematics uptown at Columbia University’s Teachers College.

Subsequently, from 1971 to 1972, Garfunkel taught math at the Litchfield Private School in Connecticut. After Simon and Garfunkel’s Greatest Hits record took off and the duo reunited for a political benefit concert, Art hung up his cap and gown, and hit the studio again as a full-time music-maker.
Sheryl Crow

Fresh out of the University of Missouri at Columbia in the early 1980s, Sheryl Crow taught music for a few semesters at Fenton, Missouri’s Kellison elementary school.

The gig provided Sheryl with time flexibility via long holiday breaks and whole summers off to work on her own music and to hone her voice as a singer of commercial jingles. One of Crow’s first jobs was a “back to school” ad for the Famous-Barr department store.

After becoming a superstar, Sheryl Crow was awarded honorary doctorates from the University of Missouri and Southeast Missouri State University.
Todd Rundgren

Multitalented rock visionary Todd Rundgren added “college instructor” to his long list of credits in 2010, when Indiana University named him a Wells Scholar Professor.

Partnered with esteemed educator and good friend Glenn Gass, Rundgren taught two of the four weeks of a course titled, fittingly, “The Music of Todd Rundgren.” When announcing the course, Gass said: “Todd is a treasure trove of memories, knowledge, stories. The class is a way for him to celebrate what he’s done and allows him to share his experiences with students who really want to hear what he has to say.”

Two years later, Rundgren taught a string instrument workshop at Newark High School in Newark, Ohio.
Bob Geldof was an English teacher in Spain before joining the Boomtown Rats!

Roll with the changes

Rocks top 10 Replacement Singers

For most bands, losing a lead singer is catastrophic. But some have emerged more popular than ever.

 

Back in Black

“The best tribute band I have ever seen”

Based in Switzerland, these five talented and beautiful young musicians are growing in demand throughout the world. Founded in 2010, BACK:N:BLACK’s reputation is based on wild stage antics, passionate delivery and heart-felt crowd connections that rival stadium bands. Their die-hard conviction to blend their own love for AC/DC’s music as fans with unwavering musical competence has attracted the attentions of AC/DC itself.